Posted tagged ‘Snow’

Another Wintery Story

December 6, 2018

The Snowy Nap by Jan Brett

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After Hedgie, the hedgehog, hears the barnyard animals talk about the excitement winter brings, Hedgie decides he doesn’t want to miss out. No hibernating for him this year. Jan Bretts detailed and colorful illustrations show Hedgie as he tries to stay awake for winter, but he begins to shiver in the frosty night. Brett’s clever use of a secondary story in the border, depicts a young girl, Lisa, watching from a window. She sees Hedgie, bundles him up, and brings him into the warmth of her house. Wrapped in a tea cozy (So cute!), and placed by the window, Hedgie has a perfect spot to see winter. A snowstorm changes the landscape of the farm to a winter wonderland. Hedgie sees the chicken coop covered in snow and icicles, Lisa and the geese skating on the frozen pond, and snowmen. But poor Hedgie is getting tired. He’s almost asleep when he hears the jingle of bells. It’s pony pulling Lisa in the sleigh – a happy sight to see. Meanwhile, in the border story, the barnyard animals are peeking into the windows of Lisa’s house. With Hedgie sleeping longer each day, Lisa brings him to his burrow where he belongs. When she returns home, Lisa is in for a big winter surprise of her own. Jan Brett’s story and illustrations are truly charming. They are sure to delight any child with each page turn.

 

 

 

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A Cautionary Snow Tale

February 26, 2015

Last week I was in Boston and New Hampshire. There’s a LOT of snow there. Take a look at the drifts outside this New Hampshire house. How long does it take to shovel those snowdrifts? Let me count the days!

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In Boston, snow is piled just as high. Mother Nature played a dirty, white trick on the Northeast. Do you remember the Big Dig in Boston years ago? Well, this is the new Big Dig. Snow is still everywhere and people are continuing to dig out!

This brings to mind a wonderful nonfiction book, Over and Under the Snow, written by the very talented Kate Messner and enhanced with clever illustrations by Christopher Silas Neal.

A little girl and her dad are enjoying a cross-country ski romp in the winter woods. As they glide over the snow, the little girl sees an animal dart by and then disappear. She wants to know where it went. Her dad describes the “secret kingdom” under the snow where animals are safe and warm during the winter. It’s a lovely winter tale.

Boston has a secret kingdom under the snow, too. As Bostonians trudge over and around the piles of white stuff, there is a secret world beneath it.

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 A trash can hidden beneath a pile of snow

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A bench in the Public Garden that disappeared during one of the nor’easters

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A parked car buried by a city plow

And over the snow is something else to keep your eye on.

Icicles!

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Long, dagger-like pieces of ice hang from buildings.

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On a whim, those icicles can turn into a deadly weapon if they break free.

Watch your head!

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Unlike Kate Messner’s delightful story, the Boston Winter of 2015 is a cautionary tale. For the time being, keep a close look out for what’s over and under the snow if you’re walking through the streets of Boston.

Is it spring yet?

Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!

January 17, 2013

As the announcements of the Caldecott and Newbery Awards approach, I came across the 1948 Caldecott winner. White Snow Bright Snow was written by Alvin Tresselt and illustrated by Roger Duvoisin.

The eighteen inches of snow we had dumped on us days before Christmas has all but disappeared, and I find myself yearning for more of the fluffy white stuff. White Snow Bright Snow is the perfect answer for the winter season. It’s an ideal book to cuddle up with someone special in front of a nice warm fire and read together.

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The book starts with a snow poem, which sets the stage for what is to follow. As the story begins, the postman, the farmer, the policeman and his wife, the children, and even the rabbits are anticipating what is to come. Suddenly, snowflakes appear. The adults deal with the snow in very practical ways, but the children laugh and dance while trying to catch snowflakes on their tongues. During the day and into the night, the snow falls to create a beautiful white landscape as can be seen by Duvoisin’s double-page spread. The next day the children and the rabbits take advantage of the snow, enjoying their time outside. The adults go about their daily chores despite the snow. The snow slowly melts as the story comes to a close. “…the smell of wet brown earth filled the warm air.” When the children see the first robin, they know spring has arrived.

Tresselt’s lyrical language found throughout the story adds to the beauty of the book. And Roger Duvoisin’s use of bright red and yellow make the pages sparkle against the more subdued background colors. The team of Tresselt and Duvoisin make this book a classic.

I eagerly anticipate the new Caldecott Award winner and Caldecott Honor books.

Enjoy these snowy picture books:

Snow written by Cynthia Rylant and illustrated by Lauren Stringer

The Snowy Day written and illustrated by Ezra Jack Keats

Snow written and illustrated by Uri Shulevitz

Over and Under the Snow written by Kate Messner and illustrated by Christopher Silas Neal

Snowballs written and illustrated by Lois Ehlert

Oh! written and illustrated by Kevin Henkes

A Perfect Day written and illustrated by Carin Berger

Katy and the Big Snow written and illustrated by Virginia Lee Burton


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