Posted tagged ‘Shel Silverstein’

Hooked on Poetry

April 6, 2017

April is National Poetry Month.

What is poetry?

If you ask a child, the answer most likely would be that poetry is something that rhymes. This is true, but we also know that poetry is much more than that. Let’s look at poetry from a child’s point of view. Poems that rhyme are fun because they have rhythm and beat. Kids get into that. If a poem is funny, that’s even a better incentive to get kids hooked on poetry. Exposure to different types of poetry is key to getting kids to read more, more, more.

Mother Goose rhymes are a great starting point to engage children. Most are short and can be acted out. Don’t delay. Unlock the door to poetry, step inside with your child, and enjoy. Take a gander at the poetry books below and see which ones tickle your fancy. There is something for everyone.

mother

Mary Engelbreit’s Mother Goose: One Hundred Best-Loved Verses illustrated by Mary Engelbreit, HarperCollins

lullaby.JPG

Lullaby & Kisses Sweet: Poems to Love with Your Baby selected by Lee Bennett Hopkins and illustrated by Alyssa Nassner, Abrams Appleseed, Board Books

kennedy

Poems to Learn by Heart selected by Caroline Kennedy and illustrated by Jon J. Muth, Disney Press

Patrick

Keep a Pocket in Your Poem: Classic Poems and Playful Parodies selected and written by J. Patrick Lewis and illustrated by Johanna Wright, Wordsong

beat

Feel the Beat: Dance Poems that Zing from Salsa to Swing written by Marilyn Singer and illustrated by Kristi Valiant, Dial Books

sidewalk

Where the Sidewalk Ends written and illustrated by Shel Silverstein

 

Advertisements

Love A Tree

May 16, 2013

Today is LOVE A TREE DAY!  Every tree offers something magical – fragrant blossoms, cool shade, perfect climbing branches, colorful autumn leaves, oxygen, fruits, nuts, homes for animals, hiding places. I can’t imagine a landscape without a tree. Trees are a gift to us.

When I was in grade school, we had to memorize Joyce Kilmer’s poem, “Trees.” There were giggles and shades of embarrassment as the words, breast and bosom, stumbled out of our mouths. But the poem has stuck with me. I can still recite it, and I no longer get embarrassed when I do. Kilmer’s poem reads like a thank you prayer. The words in the last line —“But only God can make a tree”— are  powerful words and food for thought.

Here are some tree books that offer some food for thought.

A Tree Is Nice written by Janice May Udry and illustrated by Marc Simont

This book is a Caldecott Award Winner. In simple text, Udry tells how a tree can bring enjoyment to all.

Someday a Tree written by Eve Bunting and illustrated by Ronald Himler

Careless dumping of toxic materials destroys a beloved tree, but a little girl discovers something she can do to make others hope for a new beginning.

The Giving Tree written and illustrated by Shel Silvertein

A relationship between a boy and tree demonstrates unconditional love.

The Grandad Tree written by Trish Cooke and illustrated by Sharon Wilson

An apple tree grows and changes through the seasons just like the children’s grandad changes through the season of his life. Watching nature, the children realize special memories will never die.

Give a tree a hug today!


%d bloggers like this: