Posted tagged ‘Sharks’

A Picture Book Review: Small Matters

June 18, 2020

Did you know that a powerful microscope can zoom in on the tiniest of details? It’s called a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Here’s your chance to learn what this book has hidden on the pages inside.

small matters

Small Matters:  The Hidden Power of the Unseen is written by Heather Ferranti Kinser. She introduces readers to reptiles, fish, insects, and birds that have hidden powers that can’t be seen with the naked eye. On one page, there is a vibrantly colored photograph of the animal. On the opposite page, there is a zoomed-in photograph of the unseen hidden power created by the scanning electron microscope. Kinser has attached a characteristic that describes what each hidden power is. A shark is SPEEDY because it has jagged scales on the skin to help it speed through the water. A toucan’s large beak has SUPPORT because the beak has holes that are covered with a very thin film which makes the beak strong and light. Eleven examples are included in the book. Kinser has done an excellent job of explaining the hidden power in terms that readers can easily understand. The photographs are large and detailed, and the back matter includes more information on each of the examples along with book suggestions for further reading. This is a great choice for kids who are interested in animals and their hidden superpowers.

Shark Lady

July 20, 2017

If you’ve been watching the news this summer, you might have noticed shark sightings and attacks have popped up on the East Coast and the West Coast. These creatures may be scary, but they are also fascinating. Eugenie Clark knew just how intriguing sharks could be. She spent her entire life studying them and their behavior. If you have a child who has the same attraction to sharks as Eugenie Clark did, I have the perfect picture book biography to dive into.

shark lady

Shark Lady: The True Story of How Eugenie Clark Became the Ocean’s Most Fearless Scientist is written by Jess Keating and illustrated by Marta Álvarez Miguéns, Sourcebooks Jabberwocky.

Jess Keating cleverly tells the life story of Eugenie Clark. There was a time when women were considered not smart enough to become scientists. Eugenie Clark helped prove those naysayers wrong. From early on, she studied sharks and all types of fish. She went on to college and received her Bachelor of Arts degree, her master’s degree, and a doctorate in zoology. She traveled the world and dived into waters where others dared not go to explore sharks and their habits. She proved sharks could be trained and worked to make sure they were protected. Because of her work and research, Eugenie Clark became known as the Shark Lady. Marta Álvarez Miguéns’ colorful illustrations and Jess Keating’s informative text invites readers to keep turning the pages to learn about sharks and the amazing accomplishments of the Shark Lady. The back matter in the book adds another dimension for readers. It includes interesting facts about sharks, a time line of Eugenie Clark’s life, and an author’s note with bibliography. This appealing book is one to add to your collection.

 

 


%d bloggers like this: