Posted tagged ‘Science’

Climb On Board

June 1, 2017

I’m sure you’ve seen the sign, “Baby on Board.” Of course, that means someone is carrying a baby.

There are many ways humans carry babies – in wraps, in slings, in carriers attached to your back or your front, in your arms …

Like humans, animals carry their babies, too. Baby on Board: How Animals Carry Their Young is written by Marianne Berkes and illustrated by Cathy Morrison, Dawn Publications.

Animals

This is a perfect show-and-tell book for children who want to learn how a variety of animals carry their young. There are two-page spreads throughout the book, and Marianne Berkes cleverly introduces each animal with two lines of rhyming text followed by a short paragraph of factual information. Cathy Morrison’s illustrations are detailed and done in vibrant colors that invite readers to reach out and touch them. The back matter consists of a match game, read aloud suggestions, and an assortment of resources for parents and teachers to use, including math, science, and engineering activities which make Baby on Board ideal for the STEM curriculum.

If your kids love animals, climb on board for some fun and learning with this book!

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What Is Your Burning Question?

March 30, 2017

I know exactly what your burning question is:  Why is today special?

Today we celebrate Robert Wilhelm Eberhard Bunsen’s birthday. He was a chemist and the creator of the Bunsen Burner. You probably remember the Bunsen Burner from high school chemistry. It’s a gas burner used in labs, and it has a metal tube and with an adjustable air valve at the bottom. You might also remember singeing your eyebrows or hair if you got too close to the flame. Ouch!

Since this is also the end of Women’s History Month, I have the burning desire to celebrate Bunsen Burner Day and share a few more biographies of women who set the world on fire and made a difference in the field of science.

women in science

Women in Science:  50 Fearless Pioneers Who Changed the World written by Rachel Ignotofsky, Ten Speed Press

Magnificent minds

Magnificent Minds:  16 Pioneering Women in Science and Medicine written by Pendred E. Noyce, Tumblehome Learning, Inc.

hidden

Hidden Figures Young Readers’ Edition written by Margot Lee Shetterly, HarperCollins

Marie

Who Was Marie Curie? written by Megan Stine and illustrated by Nancy Harrison and Ted Hammond, Grosset & Dunlap

ideas

Ada’s Ideas:  The Story of Ada Lovelace, the World’s First Computer Programmer written and illustrated by Fiona Robinson, Abrams Books for Young Readers

Picture books worth reading:

ada

Ada Twist, Scientist written by Andrea Beaty and illustrated by David Roberts, Abrams Books for Young Readers

rosie

Rosie Revere, Engineer written by Andrea Beaty and illustrated by David Roberts, Abrams Books for Young Readers

Hot stuff here!

 

 

 

March into Women’s History Month

March 9, 2017

March is National Women’s History Month. The theme this year is “Honoring Trailblazing Women in Labor and Business.” No matter what career path women choose, they continue to make a huge difference in our world. Whether women are stay-at-home moms, in the workforce, fighting for women’s rights, or helping others less fortunate, they are a mighty force to reckon with. Women have the creativity, imagination, and ability to do anything they want.

Below are some picture book biographies that exhibit the strength and tenacity of women with a can-do spirit.

ann cole

Fancy Party Gowns:  The Story of Fashion Designer Ann Cole Lowe written by Deborah Blumenthal and illustrated by Laura Freeman

 

dorthea

Dorthea Lange: The Photographer Who Found the Faces of the Depression written by Carole Boston Weatherford and illustrated by Sarah Green

ada

Ada Lovelace, Poet of Science:  The First Computer Programmer written by Diane Stanley and illustrated by Jessie Hartland

lovelace

Ada Byron Lovelace and the Thinking Machine written by Laurie Wallmark and illustrated by April Chu

Lookup

Look Up!:  Henrietta Leavitt, Pioneering Woman Astronomer  written by Robert Burleigh and illustrated by Raúl Colón

ruth

I Dissent:  Ruth Bader Ginsburg Makes Her Mark written by Debbie Levy and illustrated by Elizabeth Baddeley

Look for these picture book biographies coming out soon.

air

Lighter than Air:  Sophie Blanchard, the First Woman Pilot  written by Matthew Clark Smith and illustrated by Matt Tavares, March 14, 2017

grace

Grace Hopper:  Queen of Computer Code written by Laurie Wallmark and illustrated by Katy Wu, May 16, 2017

warne

Kate Warne:  Pinkerton Detective  written by Marissa Moss and illustrated by April Chu, May 16, 2017

girl

The Girl Who Thought in Pictures:  The Story of Dr. Temple Grandin  written by Julia Finley Mosca and illustrated by Daniel Rieley, August 29, 2017

 

Science for Babies!

December 8, 2016

Who knew learning about science could be so much fun. Ruth Spiro, the author of Lester Fizz, Bubble-Gum Artist, has written two board books for the youngest generation dealing with science – Baby Loves Quarks! and Baby Loves Aerospace Engineering!

9781580895408

9781580895415 

You may think that’s a mouthful of words for a baby, but these books, illustrated by Irene Chan, are something to get excited about. In each book, Spiro and Chan present a science concept in a unique way so that a young child can begin to understand it on the simplest level. Open the doors to science with these fun books and explore the possibilities. With straightforward text and colorful illustrations, these books may be the stepping stones for our future scientists!

 

 

The Tree Lady

June 5, 2014

The warm weather is finally here. It’s enjoyable to feel the warmth of the sun, but sometimes the shade of a tree is as equally enjoyable. Trees are important to our environment for many reasons. One woman was well-aware of this. The Tree Lady written by H. Joseph Hopkins and illustrated by Jill McElmurry tells the story of Kate Sessions, a tree-loving woman who changed the landscape of San Diego.

photo 1 (7)

The story begins in the 1860s – a time when girls were supposed to be learning how to run a household. Kate was different. She loved the outdoors. In school, Kate was interested in anything to do with science. In particular, Kate loved trees. She was fascinated by how tall they grew, how their branches stretched outward, and how they provided homes for animals. Kate graduated from college with a degree in science and accepted a teaching job in San Diego – a dry, desert town. The first thing Kate noticed was the lack of trees. After two years of teaching, Kate decided to become a gardener. Her mission was to find a variety of trees that would withstand the sunshine and dry soil of San Diego. Soon trees from Kate’s nursery were planted along streets, around schools, in parks, and in people’s yards. When it was announced the Panama-California Exposition was going to be held in City Park in San Diego, Kate felt the park needed more trees – thousands more! With the help of friends and volunteers, there were tree-planting parties. By the time the exposition opened, there were millions of trees and plants growing in what is now called Balboa Park. Thanks to Kate Sessions and her passion for trees and plants, San Diego is the beautiful city it is today.

Hopkins pays a lovely tribute to Kate Sessions, and the charming illustrations by Jill McElmurry add to the allure of the book. This non-fiction picture book is a wonderful treat to share with children. It shows what can be accomplished when you believe in yourself and have a passion for something.

Now You See It, Now You Don’t

May 15, 2014

It’s that time of year when I begin to inventory the books in the library. Some days it takes me longer than others – especially when I discover an interesting book I had forgotten was on our shelves. That’s when inventory stops, and I take a little break to enjoy what I’ve missed. Where in the Wild? is one of those books. It’s a perfect read for anyone at anytime.

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This book is written by David M. Schwartz and Yael Schy and the amazing photographs are by Dwight Kuhn. Schwartz and Schy, who are husband and wife, teamed together to craft a book about camouflaged creatures. Various forms of poetry pose a challenge for readers as they try to discover what creatures are hidden in Kuhn’s pictures. On a separate page, additional information about that animal is included. What makes this book so appealing, besides the clever poems and fascinating facts, are Kuhn’s captivating photographs of the camouflaged creatures. After carefully searching for the hidden creature, the reader can lift the gatefold to reveal its whereabouts. I found this award-winning book  delightful, and I think young readers will, too!

If you like this book, there are two companion books by the same team:

Where Else in the Wild?

What in the Wild?

 


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