Posted tagged ‘Rhymes’

Get Ready to Turn these Pages

September 14, 2017

 

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If you’re looking for a book to get your toddler/preschooler moving, take a look at Lucy Cousins’ picture book, Hooray for Birds. This book is filled with bold, bright colors and invites the child to imagine he/she is a bird and do what the birds do. The fast–paced rhymes begin with a “Cock-a-doodle-doo!” in the morning and continue throughout the day until it’s time to say good night. Don’t be surprised if your little one insists you read the book again and again, and you’ll oblige because this book is fun for everyone!

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Bird, Balloon, Bear written and illustrated by Il Sung Na is quite the opposite of Hooray for Birds. This is a gentle story about finding the courage to make a new friend. The text is spare and the illustrations in the book are muted and soft with a fun double page spread. What makes this book special is it lends itself to cuddling together as you turn the pages to reveal how a friendship blossoms.

These two books are looking for a space in your library.

 

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Classic Books: RILEY CHILD-RHYMES with HOOSIER PICTURES

January 24, 2013

Books are fascinating. When my niece gave me a copy of Riley Child-Rhymes with Hoosier Pictures written by James Whitcomb Riley, I was captivated. The book is an 1898 edition and belonged to my great aunt. The pages are yellowed and it’s falling apart, but Riley’s poems and the Hoosier Pictures by Will Vawter are all there. I was holding a treasure!

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James Whitcomb Riley (1849-1916) was known as the Hoosier Poet because of the poems he wrote, using childhood memories and dialect of his home state of Indiana The illustrations, known as Hoosier Pictures, were created by Will Vawter (1871-1941), also of Indiana. He worked closely with Riley and illustrated many of Riley’s works.

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In Child-Rhymes, Vawter’s black and white illustrations enhance Riley’s poems. Some poems are short and others are longer and tell a story. “Little Orphant Annie” entertains children with witch-tales and warns them “the Gobble-uns ‘at gits you Ef you Don’t Watch Out!” “The Bear Story” is a funny tale of how a youngster went out to kill a bear. It reminds me of how children love to exaggerate when telling adventures of their own. In “The Happy Little Cripple,” Riley writes about a little child who has “Curv’ture of the Spine” and whose Pa “runned away” because he was drunk. They’re not your ordinary rhymes of today, but Riley’s poems provide humor and insight into what life was like in simpler times.

This new-found treasure has been a source of entertainment and has enriched my life.

Another Classic Book

January 20, 2012

There they go again. Whining. Complaining. “I can’t do it. I can’t.” Before you pop your top at your youngsters, grab a copy of “I Can’t” Said The Ant by Polly Cameron and share it. It’s a classic!

Poor Miss Teapot has fallen to the floor and can’t get up. With catchy one-line rhymes, the objects in the kitchen persuade an ant to help.

 “Push her up,” said the cup.

 “I can’t,” said the ant.

Never fear! With encouragement from the kitchen objects and cooperation from the ant and his friends, Miss Teapot is mended and lifted to safety.

Red is the color of choice for the illustrations, and the text is done in olive green. The color palette is a bit limited compared to today’s picture books, but the rhymes make the book sparkle. Read it once. Read it twice. Read it again. You and your listeners will be repeating the one-liners over and over!

Think of the fun you can have making up your own rhymes and drawing pictures to go with them. This classic book never loses its appeal!


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