Posted tagged ‘Poetry’

Take Your Pants for a Walk Day

July 27, 2017

We all wear pants at some time or another, and most of us do some walking. Well, today it’s National Take Your Pants for a Walk Day. So, put on some fancy pants and go for a walk. If you’re not in the mood to do that, maybe one of these pantsy picture books will tickle your fancy.

greenpantsGreen Pants written and illustrated by Kenneth Kraegel, Candlewick Press

petePete With No Pants written and illustrated by Rowboat Watkins, Chronicle Books

grumpyGrumpy Pants written and illustrated by Claire Messer, Albert Whitman & Company

whereWhere Do Pants Go? written by Rebecca Van Slyke and illustrated by Chris Robertson, Sterling Children’s Books

ohOH, NO! Where Are My Pants? edited by Lee Bennett Hopkins and illustrated by Wolf Erlbruch, HarperCollins

Coming in September 2017

princessPrincesses Wear Pants written by Savannah Guthrie and Allison Oppenheim and illustrated by Eva Byrne, Abrams Books for Young Readers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

READ ACROSS AMERICA DAY

March 2, 2017

cat

One book, two books.

Old books, new books.

 

Some are short and funny, too.

Some are long like a size twelve shoe.

 

Magic happens in a book.

Turn the page and take a look.

read

 

Books can fly you to the moon

Just by riding on a spoon.

 

Happy, sad, or full of flair

Books can take you anywhere.

So …

Grab a book and grab a friend.

Read a book until the end.

 

It’s Read Across America Day!

Do you know what Dr. Seuss would say?

 

“The more that you read, the more things you will know.

The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.”

hats-off

 

In Celebration of Black History Month

February 4, 2016

February is Black History Month.  There are many excellent books dealing with the tragedies, triumphs, and accomplishments of African-Americans. Below is a short list of fiction and non-fiction picture books to share with young readers. Enjoy them, discuss them, and celebrate the successes Black Americans have made and how they have helped shape the history and culture of our country.

Non-fiction:

The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch written by Chris Barton and illustrated by Don Tate

Brick by Brick written by Charles R. Smith, Jr. and illustrated by Floyd Cooper

The Cart That Carried Martin written by Eve Bunting and illustrated by Don Tate

Freedom in Congo Square written by Carole Boston Weatherford and illustrated by R. Gregory Christie

Heart and Soul: The Story of America and African Americans written and illustrated by Kadir Nelson

I Lay My Stitches Down: Poems of American Slavery by Cynthia Grady, illustrated by Michele Wood

Jazz Age Josephine written by Jonah Winter and illustrated by Marjorie Priceman

Little Melba and Her Big Trombone written by Katheryn Russell-Brown and illustrated by Frank Morrison

Mumbet’s Declaration of Independence written by Gretchen Woelfle and illustrated by Alix Delinois

Queen of the Track: Alice Coachman: Olympic High-Jump Champion written by Heather Lang and illustrated by Floyd Cooper

Two Friends:  Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass written by Dean Robbins and illustrated by Sean Qualls and Selina Alko

Words Set Me Free: The Story of Young Frederick Douglass by Lesa Cline-Ransome and illustrated by James E. Ransome

Fiction:

A Dance Like Starlight written by Kristy Dempsey and illustrated by Floyd Cooper

Firebird written by Misty Copeland and illustrated by Christopher Myers

The Hula-Hoopin’ Queen written by Thelma Lynne Godin and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley Newton

The Quickest Kid in Clarksville written by Pat Zietlow Miller and illustrated by Frank Morrison

White Water: inspired by a true story written by Michael S. Bandy and Eric Stein and illustrated by Shadra Strickland

Wind Flyers written by Angela Johnson and illustrated by Loren Long

“We should emphasize not Negro History, but the Negro in history. What we need is not a history of selected races or nations, but the history of the world void of national bias, race hate, and religious prejudice.” ~ Carter Woodson

 

 

Winnie-the-Pooh and Twin Girls, Too!

July 23, 2015

We recently moved from the Midwest back to the East Coast. It’s been an adventure, but the best part of it is that we are now closer to our daughter and son-in-law. And the pièce de résistance is the impending births of identical twin girls. Yes, we’re going to be grandparents!

Last Sunday we celebrated the upcoming births with a baby shower. Close friends and family made the Winnie-the-Pooh-themed gathering a perfect afternoon. Come join the fun!

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Enter

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It’s the 100 Aker Wood!

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Presents and Balloons

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Pooh’s friends and Pooh books were there.

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There were flowers, food, and drinks.

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Tigger Tails, Rabbit’s Munchies, Eeyore’s House Sticks, Piglets in a Blanket, Kanga’s Chicken Salad Pockets

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Roo’s Fruit Salad, Rabbit’s Carrot-Top Rolls, Tigger’s Twisted Pasta Salad, Eeyore’s “Whine”

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Pooh’s Honey Cupcakes, and Piglet’s Haycorns

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There were games, prizes, and a take-home honey bear.

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There was love. There was laughter. And the beautiful mother-to-be!

Having twins? Check out this book.

Take Two! A Celebration of Twins written by J. Patrick Lewis and Jane Yolen and illustrated by Sohpie Blackall

THE CROSSOVER

May 21, 2015

Last week while my brain was a blank page, I read Kwame Alexander’s book, The Crossover. The title refers to a basketball maneuver used by one of the main characters. Deservedly, Alexander received the Newbery Award and Coretta Scott King Honor Award for his efforts.

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The story, written in verse and poetry that has you moving and grooving, is narrated by twelve-year-old Josh Bell. He and his twin brother, Jordan, are talented basketball players. They’re like two peas in a pod until a love interest threatens to rupture the special bond the twins have. Kwame Alexander intertwines family, loyalty, sibling rivalry, and lessons of life with basketball skills to strike a rhythm that keeps readers turning the pages. When the boys are faced with a life-changing event, remembering the importance of a loving family pulls them together and makes for a heartwarming story. For me this book is a slam dunk.

One Last Shout-out

April 30, 2015

Here’s one last shout-out for Poetry Month. I Saw Esau: The Schoolchild’s Pocket Book is a must read! This book of rhymes, riddles, and tongue twisters was edited by Iona and Peter Opie and illustrated by Maurice Sendak.

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In the introduction to the book, Iona Opie notes the rhymes “. . . were clearly not rhymes a grandmother might sing to a grandchild on her knee. They have more oomph and zoom; they pack a punch. . . .” And let me tell you, some of the rhymes do exactly that! The contents of this book have been divided into a variety of categories. There are rhymes that are familiar to us from childhood, and there are those that are not so. Today, some of these old rhymes might be considered irreverent or not politically correct. Nevertheless, these are rhymes that will tickle the fancy of young children. They will make them laugh or squeal at their absurd nature.

From the category of Graces comes this rhyme.

Bless the meat,

Damn the skin.

Open your mouth

And cram it in.

Notice it’s not your usual before-meal grace.

There are many more attention-grabbing rhymes throughout the book that will shock and entertain readers. The Opies have also included end notes that give additional information and origins of the various rhymes. Combined with the talent and clever renderings of the iconic Maurice Sendak, this book is a work of genius. It’s a classic – not only for children, but also for adults who have not lost their inner child. Make sure to put this on your list of favorite books.

Let’s Talk Birds

June 19, 2014

At four o’clock each morning, birds convene outside our bedroom window and hold a tweet fest. I don’t know what they’re chirping about, but they have a lot to say at that hour. Maybe they’re planning their day. Maybe they’re gossiping about the events of the previous evening. Whatever they’re doing, it’s disturbing my beauty rest!

I enjoy watching our fine feathered friends in the bird bath during the day. Some very lovely birds come to our exclusive spa. The way they interact with other birds is very enlightening. But why, oh why, do they have to be so noisy in the morning?

If you’re a bird-lover, here are a few books to tweet about, and they won’t wake you up in the morning.

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Birds, written by Kevin Henkes and illustrated by his wife, Laura Dronzek, is a very simple story. Using birds as the subject, the story and illustrations combine color and size concepts. The narrative includes elements of imagination and surprise, and it has a very satisfying ending. Dronzek’s illustrations are bright and colorful and will delight young children.

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Feathers, a book written by Eileen Spinelli and illustrated by Lisa McCue, is poetry in flight. Spinelli cleverly introduces readers to a fascinating variety of birds by using different poetic forms. Back matter includes more information about each bird. McCue’s brightly colored illustrations are done in watercolor and acrylic. The birds are shown in their habitats and many pages include borders. This is a perfect book for young bird-lovers.

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How to Heal a Broken Wing, written and illustrated by Bob Graham, is a sweet story of a little boy who rescues a bird with a broken wing. The text is spare, but the message is powerful. With time and hope, the family works together to help heal the bird’s wing. The illustrations, which are subdued at the beginning of the story, are done in pen, watercolor, and chalk. As the story progresses and the bird’s wing heals, the illustrations become more vibrant. This book lends itself to discussions of kindness and caring.

Can you think of any other bird books to share?


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