Posted tagged ‘Poetry Month’

Fantastic News!

April 7, 2022

April is poetry month. The following may not be poetry, but it makes my heart sing!

I’m thrilled to announce my newest book, THE BIG STINK: The Legen-dairy Tale of Colonel Thomas S. Meacham and His Enormous Cheese. (This is a working title.)

I’m a children’s book author. I had two early chapter books published years ago along with a variety of educational magazine articles and stories. Then, life got in the way and my writing was intermittent. In the last five years, I’ve been free of major commitments. I’ve used those years to commit to my writing.

I happened to see an unusual story of a huge cheese that was made and delivered to the president of the United States with considerable pomp and circumstance in 1836. It piqued my curiosity, and I began researching the story behind the story in 2019. When I felt I had enough information, I wrote a fictional picture book manuscript that was based on the incident. After many revisions, using comments and suggestions from my critique partners, I sent it to my agent. She liked it, and after more revisions suggested by my agent, she sent it to various publishing houses. The common response was that the editors liked the historical information in the story but didn’t like having a mouse as a narrator. I went back to the drawing board. Or I should say, I went back to the computer board. I turned the fictional story into a narrative nonfiction manuscript. I made sure my research and facts were accurate before sharing the manuscript with my critique partners and my agent. More revisions. The new version was sent out once again. There were more rejections, but Barb McNally and her team at Sleeping Bear Press liked what they saw. Through my agent, they made an offer in August of 2021. Lucky me!

The book is now in the works with talented Lesley Breen tackling the illustrations, and Barb McNally skillfully guiding me through the editorial part of the process. You’ll be hearing more from me as the publication date in Spring of 2023 gets closer. You can check out my website here. I hope readers will find THE BIG STINK a tasty slice of cheesy history.

Let Your Spirits Soar!

April 30, 2020

During this unusual time in which we’re living, I thought I’d post something light and uplifting. So, in honor of the end of Poetry Month and the beginning of May, I give you…

Bank-Holiday-2018-May-bank-holiday-1325644

May is pretty, May is mild,

Dances like a happy child;

Sing out, robin; spring out, flowers;

April went with all her showers,

And the world is green again;

Come out, children to the glen,

To the meadows, to the wood,

For the earth is clean and good

And the sky is clear and blue,

And bright May is calling you!

May is pretty, May is mild,

Dances like a happy child,

On a blessed holiday,

Come out, children, join the play!

~ Annette Wynne

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Have a beautiful May Day!

It’s Poetry Month!

April 3, 2014

Haiku, a traditional form of Japanese poetry, has always been a favorite of mine. With only seventeen syllables in the entire poem, its simplicity is deceiving. Usually written about nature, crafting a haiku that speaks to its readers takes thought and creativity.

The book, The Year Comes Round: Haiku through the Seasons, written by Sid Farrar and illustrated by Ilse Plume is an excellent way to introduce young readers and writers to a specific form of poetry. The author writes about the changing canvas of the earth as winter, spring, summer, and fall come and go. Accompanying the seasonal poems are beautiful illustrations by Ilse Plume. The book lends itself to teaching syllables and experiencing the glories of nature as it wakes up from a long winter’s nap and evolves throughout the year. I recommend this book as a way to celebrate nature and Poetry Month.

 

Poetry Friday

April 20, 2012

“A poem begins with a lump in the throat.” ~Robert Frost

During the month of April, I’ve been introducing various types of poetry to my library students. We’ve discussed how imagination, word choice, rhythm, and emotion are important elements in poetry. Here’s a sampling from some students who took the challenge to write a poem.

With a bit of help from me, first graders worked together to create these simple, but fun poems.

Flower

Nectar

Buds

Flower power, spring shower.

Trees

Leaves

Green

Trees grow, very slow.

Apple

Red

Stem

Apple seeds, water needs.

Other students tried Haiku and a Cinquain.

Where sea turtles swim

Where sharks rule the seven seas

Is a place for me   ~Samuel Grade 3

Freedom is not free

You have to fight for its price

I thank the veterans   ~Erin Grade 5

Swishing back and forth

This field – silent and peaceful

Never to be left   ~Matteo Grade 4

Grape

Juicy, wrinkled

Rolls, crunches, shrinks

Juicy or dried fruit

Raisin   ~Sawm Grade 5

Writing is never easy, but you have to begin somewhere. I applaud these students for taking the challenge.


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