Posted tagged ‘Poems’

Today Is Earth Day!

April 22, 2021

In 1970, Gaylord Nelson, a Wisconsin senator, established the first Earth Day to bring awareness to air and water pollution. Fifty-one years later, taking care of the Earth is more important than ever. The theme of this year’s Earth Day is Restore Our Earth. Environmental issues are taking place across the world. It’s up to everyone to act responsibly in the challenges that confront us.

Books to celebrate Earth Day

Hello, Earth! Poems to our Planet written by Joyce Sidman and illustrated by Miren Asiain Lora, Eerdmans Books for Young Readers, February, 2021.

Once Upon Another Time written by Matt Forrest Esenwine and Charles Ghigna and illustrated by Andrés F. Landazábal, Beaming Books, March, 2021.

The Outdoor Scientist: The Wonder of Observing the Natural World written by Temple Grandin, Philomel Books, April, 2021.

Treaty Words: For as Long as the Rivers Flow written by Aimée Craft and illustrated by Luke Swinson, Annick Press, March, 2021.

Wonder Walkers written and illustrated by Micha Archer, Nancy Paulsen Books, March, 2021.

April is Poetry Month!

April 8, 2021

Evening sky glistens

Awash with dazzling colors

Sun whispers goodnight

~CSO

How about a little haiku to begin poetry month? An idea. Three lines. Seventeen syllables – 5-7-5. Voilà!

There is joy to be found in words that paint pictures. Choose any book below and immerse yourself and your family in the world of poetry. Read. Relax. Enjoy.

A World Full of Poems: Inspiring Poetry for Children selected by Sylvia Vardell, DK Children, 2020.

I’m Just No Good at Rhyming and other Nonsense written by Chris Harris and illustrated by Lane Smith, Little, Brown Books for Young Children updated version 2020.

My First Book of Haiku Poems: A Picture, a Poem, and a Dream written by Esperanza Ramirez-Christensen and illustrated by Tracy Gallup, Tuttle Publishing, 2019.

One Last Word written by Nikki Grimes, Bloomsbury USA Childrens, 2017.

The Poetry of US edited by J. Patrick Lewis, National Geographic Kids, 2018.

Wet Cement: A Mix of Concrete Poems written by Bob Raczka, Roaring Book Press, 2016.

The Wisdom of Trees: How Trees Work Together to Form a Natural Kingdom written and illustrated by Lita Judge, Roaring Book Press, March 2021.

The Dance of the Bees written by Fran Nuño, illustrated by Zuzanna Celej, translated by Jon Brokenbrow, Cuento de Luz SL, February 2021.

Hooked on Poetry

April 6, 2017

April is National Poetry Month.

What is poetry?

If you ask a child, the answer most likely would be that poetry is something that rhymes. This is true, but we also know that poetry is much more than that. Let’s look at poetry from a child’s point of view. Poems that rhyme are fun because they have rhythm and beat. Kids get into that. If a poem is funny, that’s even a better incentive to get kids hooked on poetry. Exposure to different types of poetry is key to getting kids to read more, more, more.

Mother Goose rhymes are a great starting point to engage children. Most are short and can be acted out. Don’t delay. Unlock the door to poetry, step inside with your child, and enjoy. Take a gander at the poetry books below and see which ones tickle your fancy. There is something for everyone.

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Mary Engelbreit’s Mother Goose: One Hundred Best-Loved Verses illustrated by Mary Engelbreit, HarperCollins

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Lullaby & Kisses Sweet: Poems to Love with Your Baby selected by Lee Bennett Hopkins and illustrated by Alyssa Nassner, Abrams Appleseed, Board Books

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Poems to Learn by Heart selected by Caroline Kennedy and illustrated by Jon J. Muth, Disney Press

Patrick

Keep a Pocket in Your Poem: Classic Poems and Playful Parodies selected and written by J. Patrick Lewis and illustrated by Johanna Wright, Wordsong

beat

Feel the Beat: Dance Poems that Zing from Salsa to Swing written by Marilyn Singer and illustrated by Kristi Valiant, Dial Books

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Where the Sidewalk Ends written and illustrated by Shel Silverstein

 

Say Goodnight

January 12, 2017

Have you ever had one of those weeks where time seems to disappear and you just can’t catch up? If it’s not one thing, it’s another. Each night as bedtime approaches, you can barely keep your eyes open. But there’s still one more thing on your to-do list.

Bedtime story!

Will you be able to achieve all your youngsters’ expectations of a bedtime story, or will you fall asleep between the pages? Never fear! When you need it the most, I have the perfect bedtime book for you to share.

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One Minute till Bedtime:  60-Second Poems To Send You Off To Sleep selected by Kenn Nesbitt and illustrated by Christoph Niemann is the go-to book when days aren’t long enough.

This book is chock-full of whimsical, funny, and delightfully appealing poems written by a host of well-known authors. Think Nikki Grimes, Jack Prelutsky, Jon Scieszka, Judith Viorst, Verla Kay, Lee Bennett Hopkins, Jane Yolen, Lemony Snicket, J. Patrick Lewis …  I could on and on naming the amazing people who are contributors, but time is of the essence. Once you open this book and begin to read, you won’t want to put it down. In a flash, you and your youngster will be captivated!

Say goodnight!

 

 

April – National Poetry Month

April 7, 2016

“Painting is poetry that is seen rather than felt, and poetry is painting that is felt rather than seen.” ~Leonardo da Vinci

Poetry is an ideal way to encourage oral language skills in children. It has a rhythmic quality with rhymes, sounds, and patterns. Poetry is like a dance with words. It can be slow with beautiful images of quiet and calm, or it can be fast with quick rhymes that elicit smiles from young listeners. Poems are something that can be shared again and again for the enjoyment of all.

Here are two poetry books I’d like to share with you – especially if you have young children or grandchildren. Both of these books have poems selected by Lee Bennett Hopkins, a talented poet, poet anthologist, and the recipient of the Regina Medal Award for 2016.

 

Lullaby & Kisses Sweet: Poems to Love With Your Baby selected by Lee Bennett Hopkins and illustrated by Alyssa Nassner, Harry N. Abrams Board Books

This book contains original poems by well-known authors such as Lee Bennett Hopkins, Laura Purdie Salas, Ann Whitford Paul, J. Patrick Lewis, and Jane Yolen.  It’s divided into five sections:  Family, Firsts, Bedtime, Play, and Food. Each section includes poems that are attention-grabbing and fun. This book is sweet, snappy, and delightfully entertaining for all, and it’s a perfect gift!

Jumping Off Library Shelves:  A Book of Poems selected by Lee Bennett Hopkins and illustrated by Jane Manning, Wordsong

This is a collection of fifteen poems written by well-known authors that explores the library and all the magic that takes place inside. Readers will enjoy Jane Manning’s enchanting illustrations done in soft pastels. This is another keeper!

Celebrating Poetry

April 9, 2015

A Pocketful of Poems written by Nikki Grimes and illustrated by Javaka Steptoe is a delightful book to share during Poetry Month.

Grimes introduces her readers to Tiana, a young girl, who offers to share her pocketful of words. In each spread, Grimes cleverly pairs free verse and haiku as Tiana embarks on a poetic journey through the seasons of the year in an urban setting. Javaka Steptoe’s ingenious illustrations feature collages, using a variety of objects and materials. His designs lend themselves to playful interaction with readers who can have fun identifying items in the collages. This award-winning team has created a lively book that will give you a pocketful of smiles. Make sure to check this one out!

A Classic Book of Poems

April 10, 2014

If you want to put some pop in your poetry reading, try Sing a Song of Popcorn. It’s a collection of poems selected by Beatrice Schenk de Regniers, Eva Moore, Mary Michaels White, and Jan Carr. The book has a copyright date of 1988, but don’t let that fool you. This book has staying power. There are 128 poems written by well-known authors such as Langston Hughes, Eve Merriam, A.A. Milne, e.e. cummings, Ogden Nash, Nikki Giovanni and more. To add to your enjoyment, the illustrations are done by Caldecott Medal artists. Each artist illustrates one of the themed sections of poems. Trina Schart Hyman does fun rhyming poems, Marcia Brown does weather poems and short poems, Margo Zemach does spooky poems, Maurice Sendak does story poems, Arnold Lobel does animal poems, Marc Simont does people poems, Richard Egielski does nonsense poems, and Leo and Diane Dillon do poems with emotions.

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This collection is rare chance to enjoy poems and illustrations by a diversified group of talented individuals. It has something to satisfy everyone’s taste and mood and will tickle and tantalize young and old readers. It’s a perfect choice for home and school.

Celebrate Poetry Month with Sing a Song of Popcorn!

It’s Poetry Month!

April 3, 2014

Haiku, a traditional form of Japanese poetry, has always been a favorite of mine. With only seventeen syllables in the entire poem, its simplicity is deceiving. Usually written about nature, crafting a haiku that speaks to its readers takes thought and creativity.

The book, The Year Comes Round: Haiku through the Seasons, written by Sid Farrar and illustrated by Ilse Plume is an excellent way to introduce young readers and writers to a specific form of poetry. The author writes about the changing canvas of the earth as winter, spring, summer, and fall come and go. Accompanying the seasonal poems are beautiful illustrations by Ilse Plume. The book lends itself to teaching syllables and experiencing the glories of nature as it wakes up from a long winter’s nap and evolves throughout the year. I recommend this book as a way to celebrate nature and Poetry Month.

 

Love A Tree

May 16, 2013

Today is LOVE A TREE DAY!  Every tree offers something magical – fragrant blossoms, cool shade, perfect climbing branches, colorful autumn leaves, oxygen, fruits, nuts, homes for animals, hiding places. I can’t imagine a landscape without a tree. Trees are a gift to us.

When I was in grade school, we had to memorize Joyce Kilmer’s poem, “Trees.” There were giggles and shades of embarrassment as the words, breast and bosom, stumbled out of our mouths. But the poem has stuck with me. I can still recite it, and I no longer get embarrassed when I do. Kilmer’s poem reads like a thank you prayer. The words in the last line —“But only God can make a tree”— are  powerful words and food for thought.

Here are some tree books that offer some food for thought.

A Tree Is Nice written by Janice May Udry and illustrated by Marc Simont

This book is a Caldecott Award Winner. In simple text, Udry tells how a tree can bring enjoyment to all.

Someday a Tree written by Eve Bunting and illustrated by Ronald Himler

Careless dumping of toxic materials destroys a beloved tree, but a little girl discovers something she can do to make others hope for a new beginning.

The Giving Tree written and illustrated by Shel Silvertein

A relationship between a boy and tree demonstrates unconditional love.

The Grandad Tree written by Trish Cooke and illustrated by Sharon Wilson

An apple tree grows and changes through the seasons just like the children’s grandad changes through the season of his life. Watching nature, the children realize special memories will never die.

Give a tree a hug today!

Classic Books: RILEY CHILD-RHYMES with HOOSIER PICTURES

January 24, 2013

Books are fascinating. When my niece gave me a copy of Riley Child-Rhymes with Hoosier Pictures written by James Whitcomb Riley, I was captivated. The book is an 1898 edition and belonged to my great aunt. The pages are yellowed and it’s falling apart, but Riley’s poems and the Hoosier Pictures by Will Vawter are all there. I was holding a treasure!

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James Whitcomb Riley (1849-1916) was known as the Hoosier Poet because of the poems he wrote, using childhood memories and dialect of his home state of Indiana The illustrations, known as Hoosier Pictures, were created by Will Vawter (1871-1941), also of Indiana. He worked closely with Riley and illustrated many of Riley’s works.

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In Child-Rhymes, Vawter’s black and white illustrations enhance Riley’s poems. Some poems are short and others are longer and tell a story. “Little Orphant Annie” entertains children with witch-tales and warns them “the Gobble-uns ‘at gits you Ef you Don’t Watch Out!” “The Bear Story” is a funny tale of how a youngster went out to kill a bear. It reminds me of how children love to exaggerate when telling adventures of their own. In “The Happy Little Cripple,” Riley writes about a little child who has “Curv’ture of the Spine” and whose Pa “runned away” because he was drunk. They’re not your ordinary rhymes of today, but Riley’s poems provide humor and insight into what life was like in simpler times.

This new-found treasure has been a source of entertainment and has enriched my life.


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