Posted tagged ‘Newbery Medal’

Picture Book Wins the Newbery!

January 14, 2016

This has been an exciting week. It’s one I wait for each year. The American Library Association announced the Youth Media Award winners for 2016. Shut the front door! Knock my socks off! The Newbery Medal didn’t go to a middle-grade or young adult novel as one would expect. I’m totally awestruck the Newbery Medal went to a picture book!

Last Stop on Market Street is an amazing book written by Matt De La Peña, illustrated by Christian Robinson, and published by G. P. Putnam’s Sons Books for Young Readers. It was also named a Caldecott Honor Book and a Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honor Book. This 757-word book packs power. Matt De La Peña’s lyrical language and Christian Robinson’s attention to detail depict a diverse population in an urban setting. Although this book may look uncomplicated, it’s a story of wants, needs, and the haves and have-nots in society. Readers are treated to the warm relationship between a young boy and his grandmother and their compassion for others. This book illustrates the kindness and beauty that encompasses us if we only take the time to notice. De La Peña and Robinson have created an unforgettable book – and Newbery Medal winner.

NEVER, NEVER underestimate the power of a picture book!

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Newbery Hopefuls

January 29, 2015

Crunch time is here. Next Monday, February second, the long-awaited Newbery and Caldecott Awards will be announced by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association. I love this time of year. My anticipation is high as I await the results.

I have to admit that although I’m familiar with many of the titles that are contenders for the 2015 Newbery Award, I haven’t read as many as I would have liked. You may have noticed the January fifteenth post, addresses Caldecott hopefuls. Those are the books I’ve concentrated on in the past few months because picture books are my great love.

Below is my list of intriguing  books. Anyone of these could receive the 2015 Newbery Medal or a Newbery Honor Medal. Do you have a favorite?

Absolutely Almost by Lisa Graff

Boys of Blur by N. D. Wilson

Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson

Caminar by Skila Brown

The Crossover by Kwame Alexander

Curiosity by Gary Blackwood

Egg and Spoon by Gregory Maguire

El Deafo by Cece Bell

Dory Fantasmagory by Abby Hanlon

The Family Romanov: Murder, Rebellion, and the Fall of Imperial Russia by Candace Fleming

Fly Away by Patricia MacLachlan

The Fourteenth Goldfish by Jennifer L. Holm

The Ghosts of Tupelo Landing by Sheila Turnage

GreenGlass House by Kate Milford, illustrated by Jaime Zollars

Half a Chance by Cynthia Lord

The Key That Swallowed Joey Pigza by Jack Gantos

The Madman of Piney Woods by Christopher Paul Curtis

The Night Gardener by Jonathan Auxier

Nightingale’s Nest by Nikki Loftin

Nest by Esther Ehrlich

The Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil Rights Steve Sheinkin

Rain Reign by Ann M. Martin

Revolution by Deborah Wiles

The Riverman by Aaron Starmer

Saving Lucas Briggs by Marisa de los Santos and David Teague

The Secret Hum of a Daisy by Tracy Holczer

A Snicker of Magic by Natalie Lloyd

The Turtle of Oman by Naomi Shihab Nye

Under the Egg by Laura Marx Fitzgerald

Upside Down in the Middle of Nowhere by Julie T. Lamana

West of the Moon by Margi Preus

Zane and the Hurricane: A Story of Katrina by Rodman Philbrick

Do you have any other suggestions?

Quirky and Unique

January 23, 2014

Kate DiCamillo is an immensely talented author. The Newbery Medal and a Newbery Honor Book are among many of the awards she has received. DiCamillo seems to have the innate ability to know exactly how to create a work that will suck readers into her story and keep them there until the very last page. No wonder she was chosen to be the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature!

I just finished reading Flora & Ulysses: The Illuminated Adventures, a chapter book, written by Kate DiCamillo and illustrated by K.G. Campbell. This book has received a lot of buzz. Could there be another award on the horizon for Kate?

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The characters in Flora & Ulysses jump off the pages with their quirky uniqueness. There’s Flora, a cynic, Ulysses, a superhero squirrel, Flora’s mom who’s immersed in writing romance novels, Flora’s dad who is a bit odd, Mrs. Tickham, the next door neighbor, and her great-nephew, William Spiver, who says he’s suffering from temporary blindness. As the story unfolds, DiCamillo cleverly weaves plot and characters together to keep readers emotionally involved and longing for more. Comic book elements add to enjoyment of this skillfully written book that garnered starred reviews and became a New York Times best-seller!

The ALA Youth Media Awards will be announced on Monday, January 27. Will Kate DiCamillo do it again?

Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!

January 17, 2013

As the announcements of the Caldecott and Newbery Awards approach, I came across the 1948 Caldecott winner. White Snow Bright Snow was written by Alvin Tresselt and illustrated by Roger Duvoisin.

The eighteen inches of snow we had dumped on us days before Christmas has all but disappeared, and I find myself yearning for more of the fluffy white stuff. White Snow Bright Snow is the perfect answer for the winter season. It’s an ideal book to cuddle up with someone special in front of a nice warm fire and read together.

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The book starts with a snow poem, which sets the stage for what is to follow. As the story begins, the postman, the farmer, the policeman and his wife, the children, and even the rabbits are anticipating what is to come. Suddenly, snowflakes appear. The adults deal with the snow in very practical ways, but the children laugh and dance while trying to catch snowflakes on their tongues. During the day and into the night, the snow falls to create a beautiful white landscape as can be seen by Duvoisin’s double-page spread. The next day the children and the rabbits take advantage of the snow, enjoying their time outside. The adults go about their daily chores despite the snow. The snow slowly melts as the story comes to a close. “…the smell of wet brown earth filled the warm air.” When the children see the first robin, they know spring has arrived.

Tresselt’s lyrical language found throughout the story adds to the beauty of the book. And Roger Duvoisin’s use of bright red and yellow make the pages sparkle against the more subdued background colors. The team of Tresselt and Duvoisin make this book a classic.

I eagerly anticipate the new Caldecott Award winner and Caldecott Honor books.

Enjoy these snowy picture books:

Snow written by Cynthia Rylant and illustrated by Lauren Stringer

The Snowy Day written and illustrated by Ezra Jack Keats

Snow written and illustrated by Uri Shulevitz

Over and Under the Snow written by Kate Messner and illustrated by Christopher Silas Neal

Snowballs written and illustrated by Lois Ehlert

Oh! written and illustrated by Kevin Henkes

A Perfect Day written and illustrated by Carin Berger

Katy and the Big Snow written and illustrated by Virginia Lee Burton

A Bevy of Winners

January 24, 2012

The wait is over. The American Library Association announced the 2012 Youth Media Award winners yesterday. Wow! Wow! Wow! Such wonderful books! Such surprises!

It’s always exciting to see who the winners are. In my “Anticipation” post, I blogged about my choices for the Caldecott and Newbery. Although none of my choices won the top prize, I was happy to see Inside Out and Back Again written by Thanhha Lai was a Newbery Honor Book, and Blackout written and illustrated by John Rocco and Me … Jane written and illustrated by Patrick McDonnell were Caldecott Honor Books. Me … Jane also won the Charlotte Zolotow Award.

Another impressive book I was pleased to see win an award was Balloons over Broadway:  The True Story of the Puppeteer of Macy’s Parade written by Melissa Sweet. It won the Sibert Award for the most distinguished informational book for children.

Browsing through the list of winners tells me I have a lot of great books to read. There’s no time to lose. I’m off to the library to see which books I can pick up. Ta, ta for now!

Anticipation

January 10, 2012

The American Library Association Midwinter Meeting is quickly approaching. Do you know what that means? The ALA will announce the Youth Media Awards. I can’t wait to hear who all the winners are, but my two favorite awards are the Caldecott and the Newbery.

There are so many excellent books out there. Choosing is difficult. I’m not an expert, but I know what I like. Here are some of my choices.

For the Caldecott Medal:  A colorful group.

Blue Chicken written and illustrated by Deborah Freedman (Viking Juvenile, September 2011)

Blackout written and illustrated by John Rocco (Hyperion Book CH, May 2011)

Red Sled by Lita Judge (Atheneum Books for Young Readers, November 2011)

Jonathan and the Big Blue Boat written and illustrated by Philip C. Stead (Roaring Brook Press, June 2011)

Me … Jane written and illustrated by Patrick McDonnell (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, April 2011)

For the Newbery Medal: 

Amelia Lost: The Life and Disappearance of Amelia Earhart written by Candace Fleming (Schwartz & Wade, February 2011)

The Mostly True Story of Jack written by Kelly Barnhill (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, August 2011)

Inside Out and Back Again written by Thanhha Lai (HarperCollins, February 2011)

Okay for Now written by Gary D. Schmidt (Clarion Books, April, 2011)

Bigger than a Bread Box written by Laurel Snyder (Random House Books for Young Readers, September 2011)

Will one of these books be an award winner or will the selection committee surprise us all?  What do you think?

 

 


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