Posted tagged ‘Margaret K. McElderry Books’

Picture Book Month: It’s a Bear!

November 15, 2012

I was pawing through some books when I came across one of my all-time favorite bear books, Winnie-The-Pooh, written by A.A. Milne and illustrated by Ernest H. Shepard. I hold this book close to my heart. It has charming characters and many pearls of wisdom. If you’ve never read it, do it!

I can “bearly” contain my excitement when it comes to a good bear book. Bear Snores On, a winner of multiple awards, is one of them. It was written by Karma Wilson and illustrated by Jane Chapman. This book deserves a big bear hug! Published by Margaret K. McElderry Books in 2002, this delightful story is told in rhyme. As the bear snores on, little critters sneak into the bear’s cave. Each brings something to share, and soon they’re having a great time as the bear snores on. When the bear is awakened, he grumbles and growls then whimpers and moans because he missed the party. The critters are more than happy to share. As a new day dawns, the bear is wide awake, but his new-found friends snore on. Jane Chapman used whites and blues to depict the outside scenes. Scenes inside the cave are done in earth tones, giving an otherwise cold, dark cave a warm feeling – just like the book!

Another bear book I’d like to roar about is Baby Bear Sees Blue written and illustrated by Ashley Wolff. This charming book was published in February of this year by Beach Lane Books. Wolff does an excellent job of portraying Mama Bear and Baby Bear as loveable creatures. Each page turn shows Baby Bear discovering different signs and colors found in nature. The illustration of Mama Bear and Baby Bear admiring a rainbow is sweet, but I adore the double spread of Baby Bear and the butterflies! This is a perfect book to introduce and reinforce colors while enjoying a romp through nature with Mama Bear and Baby Bear. Four paws up for this one!

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An Interview with Tracey Adams

October 4, 2011

Tracey Adams is an agent who knows how to kick it up a notch. In 2004 along with her husband, Josh, she co-founded Adams Literary, a boutique agency representing authors and artists in all genres of children’s literature.

I had the opportunity to meet Tracey several years ago at a SCBWI conference in New England. She has an upbeat personality, is enthusiastic about meeting new talent, and definitely knows her business. Tracey’s background experience includes working with literary agencies McIntosh & Otis and Writers House and working in the marketing and editorial departments of Greenwillow Books and Margaret K. McElderry Books.

Here’s your opportunity to meet Tracey Adams and the agency.

Can you tell me what makes Adams Literary stand out among other literary agencies?

We are exclusively children’s books, so we are experts in the market for young readers. We feel that our experience, history, and the talented authors we represent stands on its own. 

What do you see as your strengths as an agent?

I will only represent and author whose work I love and believe in. If I am passionate about a project, I will not give up on it. My stubbornness serves me well as an agent!

How do you go about meeting editors and establishing a good rapport with them?

I’ve known a lot of editors for many years and they have become friends. They introduce me to editors who work with them and new relationships are formed. We make regular visits to New York, where we were for thirteen years before moving south. I’ve also made great friendships with editors at SCBWI conferences, where of course we all spend a good amount of time together. 

Many writers are on a quest to find an agent. If you could have the perfect client, what characteristics would that client have?

Other than amazing writing? A sense of humor, a willingness to trust me, great communication skills, patience and fortitude! 

What are some of your personal dos and do nots for those writers trying to get an agent?

I do an entire talk on this. Don’t address incorrectly (Dear Sir is the worst!), be sure you’re approaching an agent who represents your genre, be open with communication, and don’t accept an offer from a publisher before contacting the agent you want!

Can you explain how your author/agent relationship works?

This is another long talk. We represent you and your work, so communication is key. We find the best home for your work and handle the contract for you. We retain certain subsidiary rights on your behalf. Agents take an industry standard commission on any monies that come in for the client. Our hope is always to work together for the entirety of your career. We’ve worked with many of our clients for well over a decade. 

Is there a certain genre you’d like to see more of and why?

We love classic, timeless, coming-of-age middle grade (because what could be better than a book that will make a difference in young readers’ lives for years to come?) and of course YA is a great market right now. In YA, we see thrillers/suspense as a new trend.

How has publishing changed in the past few years – especially with the economic downturn? Does this make your job more difficult?

It makes us even more selective, because publishers need to be more selective. 

What are the best and worst parts of being an agent?

Best – finding a great home for a great manuscript, and sharing good and life-changing news with a client – then watching as that book is welcomed into the world and finds its fans.

Worst – Having to tell a client hard news.

What’s your best piece of advice for writers?

Read everything you can in your genre! Write! And join SCBWI! (Oh – and get an agent. 😉 A good one.)

Is there something that you’d like to share that not many people know about you?

I’m a second-degree recommended black belt in taekwondo and our entire family practices the art, so I’d love to see more books featuring martial arts (and specifically girls in martial arts!) I grew up by the water and love anything nautical and exotic. And I’m always happy to see diversity of all kinds in characters. 

Thank you, Tracey Adams!

If you think you have the “write stuff” and want to kick it up a notch with Tracey, make sure to check out the submission policy at Adams Literary.


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