Posted tagged ‘Librarians’

More Great Picture Books

June 9, 2022

If you go to your local library and take a good look at the children’s books available, you’ll find a treasure trove of delightful books to browse through. Here are three more that caught my eye.

Somewhere in the Bayou

In this humorous tale of a tail starring four friends, curiosity and wrong assumptions by the opossum, the squirrel, and the rabbit lead them to regret their decisions as they try to cross a river. The mouse, on the other hand, takes a different approach to the dilemma that proves to be a “lifesaver” with an unexpected ending.

Snail Crossing

A sweet and funny story of a snail who is “cabbage bound.” A truck, a troop of ants, and a crow are obstacles in Snail’s journey to cross a road to get a cabbage. When Snail gets turned around and ends up back where he began, the ants come to the rescue. Snail’s kindness to the pushy ants is repaid when the ants carry the cabbage across the road to Snail. This is a story of persistence, kindness, and new friends.

Some Daddies

Carol Gordon Ekster shows how special daddies are in her book, Some Daddies. She introduces different types of daddies. There are daddies that wear suits, daddies that wear uniforms, and daddies that wear comfy clothes. There are daddies that have beards, daddies that sing to you at bedtime, and daddies that hug you. As the author says, “Every daddy is different.” This book is a beautiful celebration of the diversity of daddies that extols all the things that make daddies special to the children who love them. If you’re looking for a perfect gift for Dad on Father’s Day, Some Daddies might be the one.

Banned Books Week

September 28, 2015

Banned Books Week is happening now – September 27th through October 3rd. How many of the books listed below have you read? Speak up for the freedom to read, and thank librarians, teachers, and others in their efforts to make all books available for anyone to read, learn from, and enjoy.

1. Harry Potter(series), by J.K. Rowling
2. Alice series, by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
3. The Chocolate War, by Robert Cormier
4. And Tango Makes Three, by Justin Richardson/Peter Parnell
5. Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck
6. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, by Maya Angelou
7. Scary Stories (series), by Alvin Schwartz
8. His Dark Materials (series), by Philip Pullman
9. ttyl; ttfn; l8r g8r (series), by Lauren Myracle
10. The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky
11. Fallen Angels, by Walter Dean Myers
12. It’s Perfectly Normal, by Robie Harris
13. Captain Underpants (series), by Dav Pilkey
14. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain
15. The Bluest Eye, by Toni Morrison
16. Forever, by Judy Blume
17. The Color Purple, by Alice Walker
18. Go Ask Alice, by Anonymous
19. Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger
20. King and King, by Linda de Haan
21. To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
22. Gossip Girl (series), by Cecily von Ziegesar
23. The Giver, by Lois Lowry
24. In the Night Kitchen, by Maurice Sendak
25. Killing Mr. Griffen, by Lois Duncan
26. Beloved, by Toni Morrison
27. My Brother Sam Is Dead, by James Lincoln Collier
28. Bridge To Terabithia, by Katherine Paterson
29. The Face on the Milk Carton, by Caroline B. Cooney
30. We All Fall Down, by Robert Cormier
31. What My Mother Doesn’t Know, by Sonya Sones
32. Bless Me, Ultima, by Rudolfo Anaya
33. Snow Falling on Cedars, by David Guterson
34. The Earth, My Butt, and Other Big, Round Things, by Carolyn Mackler
35. Angus, Thongs, and Full Frontal Snogging, by Louise Rennison
36. Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley
37. It’s So Amazing, by Robie Harris
38. Arming America, by Michael Bellasiles
39. Kaffir Boy, by Mark Mathabane
40. Life is Funny, by E.R. Frank
41. Whale Talk, by Chris Crutcher
42. The Fighting Ground, by Avi
43. Blubber, by Judy Blume
44. Athletic Shorts, by Chris Crutcher
45. Crazy Lady, by Jane Leslie Conly
46. Slaughterhouse-Five, by Kurt Vonnegut
47. The Adventures of Super Diaper Baby: The First Graphic Novel by George Beard and Harold Hutchins, the creators of Captain Underpants, by Dav Pilkey
48. Rainbow Boys, by Alex Sanchez
49. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, by Ken Kesey
50. The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini
51. Daughters of Eve, by Lois Duncan
52. The Great Gilly Hopkins, by Katherine Paterson
53. You Hear Me?, by Betsy Franco
54. The Facts Speak for Themselves, by Brock Cole
55. Summer of My German Soldier, by Bette Green
56. When Dad Killed Mom, by Julius Lester
57. Blood and Chocolate, by Annette Curtis Klause
58. Fat Kid Rules the World, by K.L. Going
59. Olive’s Ocean, by Kevin Henkes
60. Speak, by Laurie Halse Anderson
61. Draw Me A Star, by Eric Carle
62. The Stupids (series), by Harry Allard
63. The Terrorist, by Caroline B. Cooney
64. Mick Harte Was Here, by Barbara Park
65. The Things They Carried, by Tim O’Brien
66. Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry, by Mildred Taylor
67. A Time to Kill, by John Grisham
68. Always Running, by Luis Rodriguez
69. Fahrenheit 451, by Ray Bradbury
70. Harris and Me, by Gary Paulsen
71. Junie B. Jones (series), by Barbara Park
72. Song of Solomon, by Toni Morrison
73. What’s Happening to My Body Book, by Lynda Madaras
74. The Lovely Bones, by Alice Sebold
75. Anastasia (series), by Lois Lowry
76. A Prayer for Owen Meany, by John Irving
77. Crazy: A Novel, by Benjamin Lebert
78. The Joy of Gay Sex, by Dr. Charles Silverstein
79. The Upstairs Room, by Johanna Reiss
80. A Day No Pigs Would Die, by Robert Newton Peck
81. Black Boy, by Richard Wright
82. Deal With It!, by Esther Drill
83. Detour for Emmy, by Marilyn Reynolds
84. So Far From the Bamboo Grove, by Yoko Watkins
85. Staying Fat for Sarah Byrnes, by Chris Crutcher
86. Cut, by Patricia McCormick
87. Tiger Eyes, by Judy Blume
88. The Handmaid’s Tale, by Margaret Atwood
89. Friday Night Lights, by H.G. Bissenger
90. A Wrinkle in Time, by Madeline L’Engle
91. Julie of the Wolves, by Jean Craighead George
92. The Boy Who Lost His Face, by Louis Sachar
93. Bumps in the Night, by Harry Allard
94. Goosebumps (series), by R.L. Stine
95. Shade’s Children, by Garth Nix
96. Grendel, by John Gardner
97. The House of the Spirits, by Isabel Allende
98. I Saw Esau, by Iona Opte
99. Are You There, God?  It’s Me, Margaret, by Judy Blume
100. America: A Novel, by E.R. Frank

Huzzah for Libraries and Librarians!

April 16, 2015

It’s National Library Week and School Library Month. What would we do without our beloved libraries and librarians? Both are treasures not to be overlooked or underestimated.

Whether a library is …

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big,

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small,

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public,

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or in a school,

libraries open doors to new worlds.

They shake up your imagination. They offer a wealth of knowledge, and as this year’s theme says, there are “Unlimited Possibilities @ your library.” They’re places where miracles can happen. Make the library a happy, go-to place for you and your family. And if you If you have questions, seek guidance from a librarian. They’re all-knowing!

Below are some of my favorite fiction and nonfiction picture books that pay tribute to libraries and librarians.

Library Lion written by Michelle Knudsen and illustrated by Kevin Hawkes

Bats at the Library written and illustrated by Brian Lies

The Library written by Sarah Stewart and illustrated by David Small

Miss Brooks Loves Books! (and I don’t) written by Barbara Bottner and illustrated by Michael Emberley

Stella Louella’s Runaway Book written and illustrated by Lisa Campbell Ernst

Miss Dorothy and Her Bookmobile written by Gloria Houston and illustrated by Susan Condie Lamb

A Library Book for Bear written by Bonny Becker and illustrated by Kady MacDonald Denton

Wild About Books written by Judy Sierra and illustrated by Marc Brown

Book! Book! Book! written by Deborah Bruss and illustrated by Tiphanie Beeke

The Library Dragon written by Carmen Agra Deedy and illustrated by Michael P. White

Aunt Chip and the Great Triple Creek Dam Affair written and illustrated by Patricia Polacco

The Boy Who Was Raised by Librarians written by Carla Morris and illustrated by Brad Sneed

Waiting for the Biblioburro written by Monica Brown and illustrated by John Parra

Library Lil written by Suzanne Williams and illustrated by Steven Kellogg

Please Bury Me in the Library written by J. Patrick Lewis and illustrated by Kyle M. Stone

That Book Woman written by Heather Henson and illustrated by David Small

Tomás and the Library Lady written by Pat Mora and illustrated by Raul Colón

Richard Wright and the Library Card written by William Miller and illustrated by Gregory Christie

“L” is for Library written by Sonya Terry and illustrated by Nicole Wong

Biblioburro:  A True Story from Colombia written and illustrated by Jeanette Winter

Miss Moore Thought Otherwise written by Jan Pinborough and illustrated by Debby Atwell

My Librarian Is a Camel written by Margriet Ruurs

The Librarian of Basra:  A True Story from Iraq written and illustrated by Jeanette Winter

Do you have any favorites to add?

For some inspiring quotes about libraries and librarians, click here.

On Stage in the Library

January 13, 2012

When I step into the library, I become an actor. No matter how tired I am or what mood I may be in, when students arrive at the door, I greet them with a smile. The phrase, “turn that frown upside down,” comes to mind.

Getting children excited about books and reading is one of the most important parts of my job. Doing this isn’t always easy. I pick and choose different genres and give a pep talk about each book, trying to peak interest from preschool to middle school students. I read picture books, passages from nonfiction books, and excerpts from chapter books. I’ve done experiments from science books, and I’ve given academy award-winning performances in order to instill excitement about reading. In short, I do what every librarian does who loves books and kids.   

It’s rewarding to see children excited about books. The younger students never seem to have a problem finding a “just right book.” The downside is when you have that one student, usually an intermediate or middle grade student, wandering from shelf to shelf unable to find a book. No matter what you do or say, nothing seems to interest him. My next step is to find out what the student’s likes and dislikes are and tell him to come back later after I’ve pulled some books that might peak his curiosity. Sometimes it works. Sometimes it doesn’t. Librarians do what they need to do. 

My motto is never give up and keep on smiling!      

Here are some popular authors in our library:

Sara PennypackerRick Riordan, Lenore Look, Gary Paulsen, Lisa Yee, Rachel Renée Russell


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