Posted tagged ‘Greenwillow Books’

Picture Book Month: Classic and Contemporary

November 8, 2012

In honor of Picture Book Month, I thought it would be fun to compare a classic picture book to a more recent one. I happened to be shelving Goodnight, Goodnight,  written and illustrated by Eve Rice, when it occurred to me the cover was very similar to the 2009 Caldecott Award-winning book, The House in the Night, written by Susan Marie Swanson and illustrated by Beth Krommes.

Goodnight, Goodnight, which was first published in 1980 by Greenwillow Books, takes place in an urban setting. The reader sees members of the neighborhood community wishing each other goodnight as they go about their evening routines. There’s the chestnut vendor, the baker, the fireman, the policeman, ordinary people, and a little cat that isn’t quite ready to go to bed.

This is an excellent bedtime story. It’s calming, and the text is simple. The book allows youngsters to become an active part of the story as they repeat the word, goodnight.

The illustrations are done with a minimal use of color – black, white, and yellow. A lithographic crayon, black pencil, and pen and ink were used by Rice. She added yellow to each page, which gives the windows, the lights, and the moon a glow that evokes a feeling of warmth. She has included a multitude of details that children can point out at each page turn.

The House in the Night, published in 2008 by Houghton Mifflin Company, is another bedtime story with simple text that is also calming. In comparison to the previous book, this book takes place in a suburban setting. It’s a cumulative story that begins with a simple object – a key – that is given to a child.  The story continues with the inclusion of other simple objects – light, bed, book, bird. When the bird takes flight with the child, an entire world of whimsy opens up and then circles back to the simplicity of the beginning.

Once again, the use of color is minimal – black, white, and yellow. Beth Krommes used a scratchboard technique with the addition of yellow to effectively create a feeling of coziness and warmth on each page.

Both of these books are delightful. The simplicity of the texts encourages children to read along, and the illustrations beg for children to point out details found on each page. Goodnight, Goodnight and The House in the Night make perfect lap books or bedtime books. Make it a good night and read one!

An Interview with Tracey Adams

October 4, 2011

Tracey Adams is an agent who knows how to kick it up a notch. In 2004 along with her husband, Josh, she co-founded Adams Literary, a boutique agency representing authors and artists in all genres of children’s literature.

I had the opportunity to meet Tracey several years ago at a SCBWI conference in New England. She has an upbeat personality, is enthusiastic about meeting new talent, and definitely knows her business. Tracey’s background experience includes working with literary agencies McIntosh & Otis and Writers House and working in the marketing and editorial departments of Greenwillow Books and Margaret K. McElderry Books.

Here’s your opportunity to meet Tracey Adams and the agency.

Can you tell me what makes Adams Literary stand out among other literary agencies?

We are exclusively children’s books, so we are experts in the market for young readers. We feel that our experience, history, and the talented authors we represent stands on its own. 

What do you see as your strengths as an agent?

I will only represent and author whose work I love and believe in. If I am passionate about a project, I will not give up on it. My stubbornness serves me well as an agent!

How do you go about meeting editors and establishing a good rapport with them?

I’ve known a lot of editors for many years and they have become friends. They introduce me to editors who work with them and new relationships are formed. We make regular visits to New York, where we were for thirteen years before moving south. I’ve also made great friendships with editors at SCBWI conferences, where of course we all spend a good amount of time together. 

Many writers are on a quest to find an agent. If you could have the perfect client, what characteristics would that client have?

Other than amazing writing? A sense of humor, a willingness to trust me, great communication skills, patience and fortitude! 

What are some of your personal dos and do nots for those writers trying to get an agent?

I do an entire talk on this. Don’t address incorrectly (Dear Sir is the worst!), be sure you’re approaching an agent who represents your genre, be open with communication, and don’t accept an offer from a publisher before contacting the agent you want!

Can you explain how your author/agent relationship works?

This is another long talk. We represent you and your work, so communication is key. We find the best home for your work and handle the contract for you. We retain certain subsidiary rights on your behalf. Agents take an industry standard commission on any monies that come in for the client. Our hope is always to work together for the entirety of your career. We’ve worked with many of our clients for well over a decade. 

Is there a certain genre you’d like to see more of and why?

We love classic, timeless, coming-of-age middle grade (because what could be better than a book that will make a difference in young readers’ lives for years to come?) and of course YA is a great market right now. In YA, we see thrillers/suspense as a new trend.

How has publishing changed in the past few years – especially with the economic downturn? Does this make your job more difficult?

It makes us even more selective, because publishers need to be more selective. 

What are the best and worst parts of being an agent?

Best – finding a great home for a great manuscript, and sharing good and life-changing news with a client – then watching as that book is welcomed into the world and finds its fans.

Worst – Having to tell a client hard news.

What’s your best piece of advice for writers?

Read everything you can in your genre! Write! And join SCBWI! (Oh – and get an agent. 😉 A good one.)

Is there something that you’d like to share that not many people know about you?

I’m a second-degree recommended black belt in taekwondo and our entire family practices the art, so I’d love to see more books featuring martial arts (and specifically girls in martial arts!) I grew up by the water and love anything nautical and exotic. And I’m always happy to see diversity of all kinds in characters. 

Thank you, Tracey Adams!

If you think you have the “write stuff” and want to kick it up a notch with Tracey, make sure to check out the submission policy at Adams Literary.


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