Posted tagged ‘Ghosts’

Some of My Favorite Halloween Board Books

October 21, 2021

Below are some spooky Halloween board books for your little ghosts and goblins to enjoy.

Count to five forwards and backwards in these books filled with Halloween treats.

Five Little Pumpkins written by Rosie Greening and illustrated by Lara Ede, Make Believe Ideas, 2016

Five Little Pumpkins illustrated by Ben Mantle, Tiger Tales, 2010

Five Spooky Pumpkins written by Danielle McLean and illustrated by Roisin Hahessy, Tiger Tales, 2019

Have fun with this rhyming text while finding geometric shapes.

Pumpkin Shapes written and illustrated by Charles Reasoner, Picture Window Books, 2015

Join Duck and Goose as they search for a pumpkin.

Duck & Goose, Find a Pumpkin written and illustrated by Tad Hills, Schwartz & Wade, 2009

These two boo books will keep spines tingling as readers find surprises on each page!

Boo (Peek-a-Flap) written by Rosa Von Feder and illustrated by Gaby Zermeño, Cottage Door Press, 2017

Boo! written by Jonathan Litton and illustrated by Fhiona Galloway, Tiger Tales, 2015

Everybody loves a party – especially a pumpkin party with all your friends!

Pumpkin Party! written by Maudie Powell-Tuck and illustrated by Gill Guile, Tiger Tales, 2015

Don’t forget a Halloween witch with push, pull, and slide fun.

My Magical Witch written and illustrated by Yujin Shin, Abrams Appleseed, 2021

Look at this sweet little pumpkin. Not all Halloween books have to be spooky.

You’re My Little Pumpkin Pie written and illustrated by Natalie Marshall, Silver Dolphin Books, 2018

Here’s a classic Halloween book about friendship written in high-flying rhyme!

Room on a Broom written by Julia Donaldson and illustrated by Axel Scheffler, Dial Books, 2012

And one last spooky lift-the-flap ghost book with lots of ghoulish surprises.

Ghost in the House written by Ammi-Joan Paquette and illustrated by Adam Record, Candlewick, 2015

Be sure to share these devilishly fun Halloween books with your youngsters!

Who’s Your Friend?

March 10, 2016

A book can be a friend, and a book can be about friends. Below are four books where friendship is discovered in different ways.

Nerdy Birdy written by Aaron Reynolds and illustrated by Matt Davies, Roaring Brook Press

Nerdy Birdy is different than most birds. He doesn’t fit in with the cool birds. When a group of nerdy birds invites Nerdy Birdy to join them, he thinks he has found his group of friends. Then Vulture arrives. The cool birds and the nerdy birds want nothing to do with someone as weird as Vulture. Nerdy Birdy knows what’s it’s like to feel all alone, and he and Vulture discover that you don’t have to be exactly the same to be friends. Davies’ clever illustrations, depicting the various birds are delightfully entertaining.

Swap! written and illustrated by Steve Light, Candlewick Press

The text in Swap is sparse, but it’s enhanced by Light’s pen and ink illustrations with bright blues and yellows for contrast. In this story, something small becomes something big. A young pirate suggests that his older pirate friend, who is down on his luck, make a swap. It starts with a small button from the old friend’s shirt. Each time they swap for bigger and better things until the old friend’s ship is renovated, and the two friends sail off together.

We Forgot Brock! written and illustrated by Carter Goodrich, Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers

Brock is Phillip’s imaginary friend. They do everything together until Brock gets left behind at the fair. Luckily, Brock is being taken care of by Anne and her imaginary friend, Princess Sparkle Dust. Phillip misses Brock and goes to search for him. When Phillip finds him, Brock introduces him to Anne and Princess Sparkle Dust and the four of them become fast friends. Goodrich’s illustrations of Brock and Anne are larger than life, but the friendship between Phillip and Anne is the perfect size.

Leo A Ghost Story written by Mac Barnett and illustrated by Christian Robinson, Chronicle Books

Leo is a ghost who has lived in the same house for a long time. When a new family moves in, they’re scared and try to get rid of him. Leo moves out and roams around, looking for a new friend. He meets Jane who thinks he’s imaginary. Poor Leo wants a friend so badly he doesn’t tell her he’s a ghost until he has to use his ghostly powers to catch a robber. No worries. Jane thinks having a ghost as a friend is much better than imaginary friends. Christian Robinson’s illustrations are done in gray, black, blue, and white, giving the story a suitable ghostly setting.

Friends come unexpectedly. Sometimes you’re looking for one and sometimes you’re not. Whatever the case may be, a friend is someone to cherish.

What’s Haunting You?

October 28, 2011

Happy Halloween!


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