Posted tagged ‘First Lines’

Beginning Lines that Hook a Reader

October 3, 2019

When it comes to writing, first lines in a book are important. You only have so long to hook a reader before they may decide to choose another book.

Here are some books that hooked me with their first lines.

hey water

Hey, Water! written and illustrated by Antoinette Portis

First lines:

Hey, water! I know you!

You’re all around.

This playful and informative book gives readers a look at the importance of water.

marshmallows

Most Marshmallows written and illustrated by Rowboat Watkins

First lines:

Most marshmallows don’t grow on trees

or come from storks

or even Mars.

This tasty book is a clever take on life according to marshmallows and how to be true to yourself.

crumugeon

The Unbudgeable Curmudgeon by Matthew Burgess and illustrated by Fiona Woodcock

First lines:

How do you budge

an unbudgeable curmudgeon

who really refuses to budge?

So how do you deal with someone who is a bad mood? You try all sorts of things in this rhythmic tale that takes readers on a bad mood-good-mood journey with a slight twist at the end.

star eater

Nova The Star Eater written by Lindsay Leslie and illustrated by John Taesoo Kim

First Lines:

Nova can’t stop eating. A munch here. A gobble there. A crunch, crunch, crunch.

If you love space, you’ll love reading about Nova’s humongous appetite for stars. But when Nova gulps down the sun, panic ensues.

Check out these books and see if you agree with me.

 

 

 

 

 

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First Lines in Picture Books

June 27, 2019

First lines in books are extremely important. They provide a hint of what is to come in the pages that follow. They can tell readers who the main character is, what the problem or conflict is, or where the story is taking place. First lines are a golden ticket to a journey through a book.

Let’s take a look at some first lines in picture books.

 

sophieFrom Sophie’s Squash written by Pat Zietlow Miller and illustrated by Anne Wilsdorf

One bright fall day, Sophie choose a squash at the farmer’s market.

Her parents planned to serve it for supper, but Sophie had other ideas.

Here the first lines reveal the time of year, the main character, and the fact that the squash would not be served at supper. What will Sophie do with the squash? Turn the page and read.

 

hedgehogFrom Hedgehog Needs a Hug written and illustrated by Jen Betton

When Hedgehog awoke in his cozy nest, he felt down in the snout and droopy in the prickles. I’ll feel better if I get a hug, he thought.

These first lines introduce us to the main character and his wants and needs. Included in these lines are playful descriptions that will surely delight readers.

 

hatFrom This Is Not My Hat written and illustrated by Jon Klassen

This hat is not mine. I just stole it. 

These are definitely not typical first lines in a story. They elicit surprise and reveal a problem which makes readers want to know what’s going to happen next.

 

house onceFrom A House That Once Was written by Julie Fogliano and illustrated by Lane Smith

Deep in the woods

is a house

just a house

that once was

but now isn’t a home.

Here the first lines introduce readers to the setting deep in the woods. In this case, the main character happens to be a house that now “isn’t a home.” These lines create a sense of curiosity. Why isn’t the house a home anymore? What happened? Readers will want to turn the pages to find out more.

 

lighthouseFrom Hello Lighthouse written and illustrated by Sophie Blackall

On the highest rock of a tiny island

at the edge of the world stands a lighthouse.

It is built to last forever.

Sending its light out to sea,

guiding the ships on their way.

The first line captures the attention of readers, revealing where this story takes place —”the highest rock of a tiny island at the edge of the world…”  Imagine that! The line, “It is built to last forever,” suggests many keepers of the lighthouse have tended the light, keeping ships safe. As the weather and seasons change, “Hello! …Hello! …Hello!” is repeated throughout the story, inviting readers to learn more about the lighthouse and its inhabitants.

 

When creating your masterpiece, hook readers immediately with your first lines and keep them turning the pages!

 

 

 

 


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