Posted tagged ‘Fiction Picture Books’

Rock On!

July 13, 2017

What is it about rocks? An overabundance of toys can be there for the taking, but if there are rocks around that’s the first thing my granddaughters grab. Their mother was exactly the same. Rocks seem to call out kids. Who knew they could make little ones so happy?

Today happens to be International Rock Day. Pick up a rock and see if it speaks to you. I find the ones that speak the loudest to me are diamonds, emeralds, rubies …

Maybe one of these books will explain the fascination kids have with ordinary rocks.

Nonfiction Books:

if you find a rock If You Find a Rock written by Peggy Christian and photographs by Barbara Hirsch Lember, Harcourt Brace and Company

national geoEverything Rocks and Minerals written by Steve Tomecek, National Geographic Society

livelyA Rock is Lively written by Dianna Hutts Aston and illustrated by Sylvia Long, Chronicle Books

can beA Rock Can Be… written by Laura Purdie Salas and illustrated by Violeta Dabija, Millbrook Press

rocksRocks! Rocks! Rocks! by Nancy Elizabeth Wallace, Cavendish Square Publishing

lets goLet’s Go Rock Collecting written by Roma Gans and illustrated by Holly Keller, HarperCollins

Fiction Books:

singIf Rocks Could Sing by Leslie McGuirk, Tricycle Press

RhodaRhoda’s Rock Hunt written by Molly Beth Griffin and illustrated by Jennifer A. Bell, Minnesota Historical Society Press

roxRoxaboxen written by Alice McLerran and illustrated by Barbara Cooney, HarperCollins

 

 

 

 

 

 

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STICK AND STONE

February 18, 2016

Stick and Stone written by Beth Ferry and illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld is a must-have book. When I saw it in our local library, I immediately checked it out.

Beth Ferry tells a beautiful story of friendship found, lost, and found again with a prickly bully thrown in for extra measure. The text (152 words) is cleverly written in rhyme and Tom Lichtenheld’s illustrations are both heart-warming and heart-wrenching. You’ll love Stick and Stone as they wade through good times and bad in their efforts to maintain their friendship. It’s an ideal book for all ages with a timeless message. You’ll find this book to be “a perfect ten to the end.”

In Celebration of Black History Month

February 4, 2016

February is Black History Month.  There are many excellent books dealing with the tragedies, triumphs, and accomplishments of African-Americans. Below is a short list of fiction and non-fiction picture books to share with young readers. Enjoy them, discuss them, and celebrate the successes Black Americans have made and how they have helped shape the history and culture of our country.

Non-fiction:

The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch written by Chris Barton and illustrated by Don Tate

Brick by Brick written by Charles R. Smith, Jr. and illustrated by Floyd Cooper

The Cart That Carried Martin written by Eve Bunting and illustrated by Don Tate

Freedom in Congo Square written by Carole Boston Weatherford and illustrated by R. Gregory Christie

Heart and Soul: The Story of America and African Americans written and illustrated by Kadir Nelson

I Lay My Stitches Down: Poems of American Slavery by Cynthia Grady, illustrated by Michele Wood

Jazz Age Josephine written by Jonah Winter and illustrated by Marjorie Priceman

Little Melba and Her Big Trombone written by Katheryn Russell-Brown and illustrated by Frank Morrison

Mumbet’s Declaration of Independence written by Gretchen Woelfle and illustrated by Alix Delinois

Queen of the Track: Alice Coachman: Olympic High-Jump Champion written by Heather Lang and illustrated by Floyd Cooper

Two Friends:  Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass written by Dean Robbins and illustrated by Sean Qualls and Selina Alko

Words Set Me Free: The Story of Young Frederick Douglass by Lesa Cline-Ransome and illustrated by James E. Ransome

Fiction:

A Dance Like Starlight written by Kristy Dempsey and illustrated by Floyd Cooper

Firebird written by Misty Copeland and illustrated by Christopher Myers

The Hula-Hoopin’ Queen written by Thelma Lynne Godin and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley Newton

The Quickest Kid in Clarksville written by Pat Zietlow Miller and illustrated by Frank Morrison

White Water: inspired by a true story written by Michael S. Bandy and Eric Stein and illustrated by Shadra Strickland

Wind Flyers written by Angela Johnson and illustrated by Loren Long

“We should emphasize not Negro History, but the Negro in history. What we need is not a history of selected races or nations, but the history of the world void of national bias, race hate, and religious prejudice.” ~ Carter Woodson

 

 


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