Posted tagged ‘Classic Books’

Memories and Egg Magic

March 29, 2018

My grandmother came to America from what is now called Slovakia. She was a thrifty woman. She lived in a small bungalow in the city of Milwaukee. She never owned a car. Instead, she walked everywhere or took public transportation.  She made her own clothes and poo-pooed spending money on frivolous things. Her backyard was a garden filled with fruits, herbs, and vegetables. We ate them fresh in the summer and canned in the winter. The aroma from her kitchen was always inviting – especially during the holidays. Her breads and pastries were to die for. I was convinced my grandmother could do anything. She even made magic with Easter eggs. She used natural dyes – onion skins, cut beets, spinach … I was always amazed to see what color the eggs would be when they came out of the pot. Whether it be taking a special bus trip downtown, picking vegetables from the garden, or helping make apple strudel, being with my grandmother was always a magical and memorable experience.

Make a magical and memorable experience with your kids. Try using natural dyes to color your eggs. It’s a great science project!

https://www.stevespanglerscience.com/2012/03/28/day-4-egg-week-dying-easter-eggs-naturally/

Below are some other links to help you along the way to beautifully-colored eggs.

https://www.mommypotamus.com/how-to-dye-easter-eggs-naturally-with-everyday-ingredients/

http://www.kaleyann.com/naturally-dyed-easter-eggs/

https://whatscookingamerica.net/Eggs/EasterEggDye.htm

Speaking of memorable, here are some of my favorite classic books for this season.

golden

The Golden Egg Book written by Margaret Wise Brown and illustrated by Leonard Weisgard, Golden Books, 2004

country

The Country Bunny and the Little Golden Shoes written by Du Bose Heyward and illustrated by Marjorie Flack, Harcourt Brace and Company, 1939

eggs

Rechenka’s Eggs written and illustrated by Patricia Polacco, Philomel Books, 1988

velvet

The Velveteen Rabbit written by Margery Williams and illustrated by William Nicholson, Doubleday Books for Young Readers, 1958

peter

The Tale of Peter Rabbit written and illustrated by Beatrix Potter, Warne Frederick & Company, 2009

 

Advertisements

Books + Imagination = A Great Adventure

January 11, 2018

One flashlight. Three kids. An adventure in the making.

Author, Matt Forrest Esenwine, and illustrator, Fred Koehler team up to create an imaginative adventure that begs the reader to keep turning the pages.

flashlight

Flashlight Night, written in rhyme, begins with three children sitting in a tree house filled with books. When the older boy turns on the flashlight, the night comes alive, and so do their imaginations. The children embark on a grand backyard adventure following the path of the light. Each page turn brings the children into a new adventure. A kitten becomes a tiger, the underneath of a deck reveals an Egyptian tomb, a pool becomes an ocean with a pirate and a ship, sailing through rough waters where a sea monster suddenly appears. A stuffed teddy becomes an enormous bear that helps save the three adventurers and lets them return safely to their tree house. Keep a close eye on Fred Koehler’s illustrations done in pencil and digitally colored. They cleverly reveal what classic books motivate the children’s adventure.

What light shines on your imagination?

Read to Your Child Day

February 14, 2013

Have a heart! Not only is it Valentine’s Day, but it’s also Read to Your Child Day. What better gift to give to your child than a book that you can read together. It’s a great way to bond and to instill the love of reading on this special day.

Here are some classic book suggestions from our family’s treasure trove of books that have been well read over the years.

Toddler Books

IMG_0060

Pat the Bunny was a real favorite in our house, but I think we patted the bunny a bit too often.

IMG_3218

The pop-up version of The Little Engine that Could provides lots of fun for both parent and child, but the original version is still my favorite.

Picture Books

IMG_3209

While living in the Boston area, my daughter made Make Way for Ducklings one of her favorite picture books.

photo 2[1]

As you can see, she still loves those ducklings!

IMG_3215

Dr. Seuss’ And to Think that I Saw It on Mulberry Street is a great way to encourage imagination!

IMG_3224

Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel and Katy and the Big Snow are long-time favorites for both boys and girls.

Beginning Readers

IMG_3214

Who could not love these two books? The Cat in the Hat and Frog and Toad Together

For Middle Grade Readers

IMG_3219

Here are two more enduring classics to enjoy. Runaway Ralph and Charlotte’s Web

For Older Readers

Little Women and The Secret Garden

 IMG_3220

IMG_3212

These books have remained all-time favorites in our house. The older copy of Little Women belonged to my mom and was passed on to me. The newer copy belongs to my daughter. The older copy of The Secret Garden was given to me as a gift, and the copy on the right I gave to my daughter.

There are so many wonderful books to share. Children grow up quickly. Don’t let a day pass by without reading to them or with them.

IMG_0053

You’re never too old to be read to. So cozy up with your child and some books in a comfy chair and read!

Picture Book Month: A-CHOO!

November 29, 2012

Stand back! I’m going to sneeze! Those children of mine – those cute little kiddos who sit on the library rug every Tuesday – gave me a special gift for Thanksgiving. Cold germs! So on Thanksgiving Day I wasn’t at the top of my game. There was no clever repartee from this girl, and my appetite just wasn’t there for all that yummy food. Oh, pshaw!

Seeing the expressions on family faces as I was about to sneeze was priceless. It brought back fond memories of a book that was a family favorite. Stand Back,” Said The Elephant, “I’m Going To Sneeze!” *

The original version, as seen above, was published in 1971. This entertaining book was written by Patricia Thomas and illustrated by Wallace Tripp. The rhyming text flows easily, and humor abounds as the water buffalo, monkeys, parrot, bees, bear, crocodile, and a bevy of other animals politely ask the elephant not to sneeze. As the animals run for cover to escape the aftermath of the sneeze, a little gray mouse scares the elephant — eek — and stops the sneeze. When the elephant realizes the mouse doesn’t want to hurt him, the pachyderm has a shivering, shaking, quivering, quaking laugh that causes chaos among the animals. Tripp’s illustrations, done in black and white with shades of yellow and green, provide humor for everyone.

This past Tuesday my sneezes were animated and real as I shared this classic story with my students. This book is nothing to sneeze at!

*This is the 1990 full-color version of the book.

Fat Cell Explosion and Wholesome Books

May 20, 2011

Recently, I bought boneless chicken breasts at a grocery store that looked more like turkey breasts. If those chickens wore bras, Mother Hen would have had to special order bras to fit their fifty-two double F breast size. To put it simply, one breast could have easily fed a family of four.

What’s happening to our food?

This past week there was a newspaper article about watermelons exploding in China. It seems that farmers fed the melons overdoses of growth chemicals during rainy weather.

Plants + Water + Chemicals = BOOM!

Fat cells are becoming the new fad in our population. Why? This is my highly unscientific theory. First of all, many of us don’t eat right. Eating large portions of fast food too often and making poor snack choices have become a way of life for many. Secondly, chemicals are fed to plants and animals to plump them up and get them to the market faster. We ingest those chemicals which, in turn, cause us to “grow.” If we don’t make healthy food choices and we continue to eat the fast food way, we’re getting a double whammy of enhanced foods.  

There will be consequences if we don’t start to change our ways. I can see the headlines now:  “BOOM! American Population Literally Explodes!” And there we are – all over the front page! 

Don’t wait a minute longer. We may not be able to save ourselves, but we can save our kids by getting them on the road to healthy eating. You can start by following these tongue-in-cheek suggestions.

Eat oatmeal because your mother said it was good for you.

Buy organic, but be prepared to pay through the nose and have little left to feed the stomach.

Grow your own food. Note:  Chickens and cows are not easy to grow.

Better yet, stop eating food and feed your brain. Have your kids devour these wholesome books instead.

For Girls:  Little Women by Louisa May Alcott, Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery, The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett, Heidi by Johanna Spyri

For Boys:  Hans Brinker or The Silver Skates by Mary Mapes Dodge, Call of the Wild and White Fang by Jack London, Farmer Boy by Laura Ingalls Wilder, Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson


%d bloggers like this: