Posted tagged ‘Boston Marathon’

Celebrate National Women’s History Month

March 8, 2018

The month of March we celebrate the amazing women who have made valuable contributions to our nation and have inspired and empowered young girls to do the same.

Check out the variety of picture book biographies below of women who have made a huge difference in our world.

pictures

The Girl Who Thought in Pictures written by Julia Finley Mosca and illustrated by Daniel Rieley,  Innovation Press, 2017

 

figures

Hidden Figures written by Margot Lee Shetterly and illustrated by Laura Freeman, HarperCollins, 2018

margaret

Margaret and the Moon written by Dean Robbins an illustrated by Lucy Knisley, Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers, 2017

Wells

Ida B. Wells Let the Truth Be Told written by Walter Dean Myers and illustrated by Bonnie Christensen, Amistad Press, 2015

shaking

Shaking Things Up written by Susan Hood, HarperCollins, 2018

fancy

Fancy Party Gowns written by Deborah Blumenthal and illustrated by Laura Freeman, Little Bee Books, 2017

shark

Shark Lady written by Jess Keating and illustrated by Marta Alvares Miguens, Sourcebooks Jabberwocky, 2017

Ruth

I Dissent written by Debby Levy an illustrated by Elizabeth Baddeley, Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, 2016

grace

Grace Hopper Queen of the Computer Code written by Laurie Wallmark and illustrated by Katy Wu, Sterling Children’s Books, 2017

girl

Girl Running written by Annette Bay Pimentel and illustrated by Micha Archer, Nancy Paulsen Books, 2018

harper

Alabama Spitfire written by Bethany Hegedus and illustrated by Erin McGuire, Balzer & Bray/Harperteen, 2018

Mae

Mae Among the Stars written by Roda Ahmed and illustrated by Stasia Burrington, HarperCollins, 2018

ludy

Long-Armed Ludy written by Jean L.S. Patrick and illustrated by Adam Gustavson, Charlesbridge Publishing, 2017

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Boston Marathon Inspires

April 23, 2015

The Boston Marathon, which took place on Patriot’s Day, is this country’s oldest running event. The day was raw and rainy – one of the coldest marathons in years. Police presence was undeniable. Security was tight. Streets were blocked off around the finish line, and there were checkpoints where spectators’ bags and backpacks were searched. Despite that, there was a vibe in the air – a Boston Strong vibe.

About 30,000 people ran the marathon on Monday with approximately a million people cheering them on.

cowbell

Ring that cowbell!

There are so many words to describe my feelings as I watched the marathon.

I was amazed by the participants and their special reasons for running the marathon. Their dedication and determination still bowls me over.

I was inspired by those who have physical disabilities and chose to participate.  Maickel Melamed, a native of Venezuela, has a rare form of muscular dystrophy which makes it very difficult for him to walk. It took him a little over twenty hours, but with determination, Melamed achieved his goal of completing the Boston Marathon. Now there’s a champion!

I was proud to see our military men and women running in uniform and their heavy boots!

I was excited to watch as the women’s and men’s elite runners battled to be crowned the winners. Special cheers rang out for our elite American runners.

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I was emotional seeing the place where one of the bombs went off in 2013.

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I was sympathetic as I watched runners make the long trek to the buses after they crossed the finish line. It was the agony of “de-feet,” legs, and the unusually cold weather.

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Patriot’s Day and the Boston Marathon remind me of the strength, courage, hope of people. It’s truly a day to be a proud American.

If you’re interested in the history of the Boston Marathon, check out these books.

Boston Marathon-Centennial Race Edition by Tom Derderian

26 Miles to Boston: The Boston Marathon Experience from Hopkinton to Copley Square  by Michael Connelly


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