Posted tagged ‘Birds’

Get Ready to Turn these Pages

September 14, 2017

 

birds2

If you’re looking for a book to get your toddler/preschooler moving, take a look at Lucy Cousins’ picture book, Hooray for Birds. This book is filled with bold, bright colors and invites the child to imagine he/she is a bird and do what the birds do. The fast–paced rhymes begin with a “Cock-a-doodle-doo!” in the morning and continue throughout the day until it’s time to say good night. Don’t be surprised if your little one insists you read the book again and again, and you’ll oblige because this book is fun for everyone!

bear

Bird, Balloon, Bear written and illustrated by Il Sung Na is quite the opposite of Hooray for Birds. This is a gentle story about finding the courage to make a new friend. The text is spare and the illustrations in the book are muted and soft with a fun double page spread. What makes this book special is it lends itself to cuddling together as you turn the pages to reveal how a friendship blossoms.

These two books are looking for a space in your library.

 

Advertisements

Do You Have a Plan?

July 7, 2016

Do you have a plan? I have one. I want to read this picture book.

Shhh

Shh! We Have A Plan is written and illustrated by Chris Haughton. It’s an award-winning book published in 2014 by Candlewick Press. It’s been on my list to read for quite some time. I now have it. I’ve read it. Might I say, WOW! Chris Haughton conceived an idea, and in 102 words he created an amazing picture book.

 

Four friends see a bird they want to catch. They make a plan, but the littlest friend isn’t quite on track with their idea. Shh! Don’t tell, but each time the friends try to catch the bird, they bungle it. They try again and again with no success. The littlest friend has a simple plan of his own that works. Birds galore appear. His friends are thrilled until a BIG bird comes along. They run. The end result is no bird – nothing – until a squirrel appears. Do the friends have another plan?

 

Shh, don’t tell anyone, but this review is longer than Chris Haughton’s entire story. The simplicity, subtle humor, and illustrations which are done in blues and bright colors make this book a winner. If you haven’t read it, make a plan to get it today!

Who’s Your Friend?

March 10, 2016

A book can be a friend, and a book can be about friends. Below are four books where friendship is discovered in different ways.

Nerdy Birdy written by Aaron Reynolds and illustrated by Matt Davies, Roaring Brook Press

Nerdy Birdy is different than most birds. He doesn’t fit in with the cool birds. When a group of nerdy birds invites Nerdy Birdy to join them, he thinks he has found his group of friends. Then Vulture arrives. The cool birds and the nerdy birds want nothing to do with someone as weird as Vulture. Nerdy Birdy knows what’s it’s like to feel all alone, and he and Vulture discover that you don’t have to be exactly the same to be friends. Davies’ clever illustrations, depicting the various birds are delightfully entertaining.

Swap! written and illustrated by Steve Light, Candlewick Press

The text in Swap is sparse, but it’s enhanced by Light’s pen and ink illustrations with bright blues and yellows for contrast. In this story, something small becomes something big. A young pirate suggests that his older pirate friend, who is down on his luck, make a swap. It starts with a small button from the old friend’s shirt. Each time they swap for bigger and better things until the old friend’s ship is renovated, and the two friends sail off together.

We Forgot Brock! written and illustrated by Carter Goodrich, Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers

Brock is Phillip’s imaginary friend. They do everything together until Brock gets left behind at the fair. Luckily, Brock is being taken care of by Anne and her imaginary friend, Princess Sparkle Dust. Phillip misses Brock and goes to search for him. When Phillip finds him, Brock introduces him to Anne and Princess Sparkle Dust and the four of them become fast friends. Goodrich’s illustrations of Brock and Anne are larger than life, but the friendship between Phillip and Anne is the perfect size.

Leo A Ghost Story written by Mac Barnett and illustrated by Christian Robinson, Chronicle Books

Leo is a ghost who has lived in the same house for a long time. When a new family moves in, they’re scared and try to get rid of him. Leo moves out and roams around, looking for a new friend. He meets Jane who thinks he’s imaginary. Poor Leo wants a friend so badly he doesn’t tell her he’s a ghost until he has to use his ghostly powers to catch a robber. No worries. Jane thinks having a ghost as a friend is much better than imaginary friends. Christian Robinson’s illustrations are done in gray, black, blue, and white, giving the story a suitable ghostly setting.

Friends come unexpectedly. Sometimes you’re looking for one and sometimes you’re not. Whatever the case may be, a friend is someone to cherish.

Let’s Talk Birds

June 19, 2014

At four o’clock each morning, birds convene outside our bedroom window and hold a tweet fest. I don’t know what they’re chirping about, but they have a lot to say at that hour. Maybe they’re planning their day. Maybe they’re gossiping about the events of the previous evening. Whatever they’re doing, it’s disturbing my beauty rest!

I enjoy watching our fine feathered friends in the bird bath during the day. Some very lovely birds come to our exclusive spa. The way they interact with other birds is very enlightening. But why, oh why, do they have to be so noisy in the morning?

If you’re a bird-lover, here are a few books to tweet about, and they won’t wake you up in the morning.

photo (8)

Birds, written by Kevin Henkes and illustrated by his wife, Laura Dronzek, is a very simple story. Using birds as the subject, the story and illustrations combine color and size concepts. The narrative includes elements of imagination and surprise, and it has a very satisfying ending. Dronzek’s illustrations are bright and colorful and will delight young children.

photo (7)

Feathers, a book written by Eileen Spinelli and illustrated by Lisa McCue, is poetry in flight. Spinelli cleverly introduces readers to a fascinating variety of birds by using different poetic forms. Back matter includes more information about each bird. McCue’s brightly colored illustrations are done in watercolor and acrylic. The birds are shown in their habitats and many pages include borders. This is a perfect book for young bird-lovers.

photo (6)

How to Heal a Broken Wing, written and illustrated by Bob Graham, is a sweet story of a little boy who rescues a bird with a broken wing. The text is spare, but the message is powerful. With time and hope, the family works together to help heal the bird’s wing. The illustrations, which are subdued at the beginning of the story, are done in pen, watercolor, and chalk. As the story progresses and the bird’s wing heals, the illustrations become more vibrant. This book lends itself to discussions of kindness and caring.

Can you think of any other bird books to share?


%d bloggers like this: