Archive for November 2018

It’s Clean Out Your Refrigerator Day!

November 15, 2018

Beware! This could happen to you.

You open your refrigerator and your olfactory sensory neurons are suddenly attacked by a horrendous smell. Your refrigerator stinks! It’s time to clean it out.

Pull out those veggie, fruit, and cheese drawers. Dump and examine the contents. Who knows what you may find – petrified peas, a hairy strawberry, moldy cheese. And what’s on those overcrowded refrigerator shelves? Leftover Chinese takeout from last month, a piece of not-so-fresh fish you forgot to fry, chunky milk? Take it out. Get rid of that grub and scrub-a-dub-dub! Warm soapy water and a fresh sponge will clean up those spills in no time. And don’t forget to replace that two-year-old box of baking soda that supposed to keep your refrigerator smelling clean. Now that your refrigerator sparkles and you have received the Good Housekeeping Award, give yourself a pat on the back, and quick – empty out the garbage!

 

Speaking of stinky refrigerators, check out these two books by Josh Funk. Smells like a good deal.

stench

The Case of the Stinky Stench written by Josh Funk and illustrated by Brendan Kearney, Sterling Children’s Books, 2017

defrostable

Mission Defrostable written by Josh Funk and illustrated by Brendan Kearney, Sterling Children’s Books, 2018

Happy Clean Out Your Refrigerator Day!

 

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Time

November 8, 2018

“…it can come and go and you never even notice it was there.”

forever

In Forever or a Day, Sarah Jacoby’s poetic text refers to something that is elusive. The first two pages depict a young child staring out a window as the sun rises. In the almost deserted street with skyscrapers in the background, there is a newspaper truck with Times written on the side. This is the first hint of what that elusive something is. Throughout the book, readers see a family as they move through the day. They pack suitcases, ride on a train, visit family and spend a day with them at the beach followed by an evening campfire. All too soon, their visit is over, and they retrace their steps back to their city home. Sarah Jacoby‘s illustrations are rendered in watercolors, color sticks, and mixed media. Page turns reveal bright and colorful daytime scenes and dark and sparkly nighttime scenes. Within the beautiful illustrations and text, there are layers to this story. It’s about family, love, mindfulness, and the passage of time –  time that can be elusive. This is a book you need to read slowly. Enjoy it. Appreciate it – especially with someone you love.

Hello! Hello! Hello!

November 1, 2018

Lighthouses stand tall and shine their guiding lights warning ships at sea of danger and help them navigate safely.

lighthouse

Hello Lighthouse written and illustrated by Sophie Blackall invites readers to enter the world of a lighthouse keeper from days gone by. The shape of the book is tall like a lighthouse, and Sophie Blackall’s illustrations repeat the circular features of the lighthouse throughout the book. In the first few pages, the reader sees a cutaway showing the many different levels and living spaces. Sophie Blackall’s charming illustrations done in ink and watercolor depict the warmth of the inside in contrast to the sometimes raging weather on the outside. Readers learn of the day-to-day tasks that must be done. The keeper is in charge of polishing lenses, refilling oil, trimming wicks, and winding clockwork that keeps the lamp in motion. When there is fog, a bell must be rung to warn those at sea to stay away. When snow and ice build up on the lantern room windows, it must be chipped away. And everything that happens is kept in a logbook, including the birth of the keeper’s daughter. Sophie Blackall’s rhythmic text suggests the rolling sound of waves, and she cleverly weaves the repetitive “Hello! Hello! Hello!” throughout the story showing the changing seasons and passage of time. Her beautiful words and illustrations make this unique lighthouse book shine.

Make sure to check out the back matter for more information on lighthouses.

 

 


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