Archive for May 2018

Mary Had a Little…What?

May 17, 2018

mary lamb

We all know Mary had a little lamb, but did you know that Mary Had a Little lab? That’s right! It seems she loves science and spends all of her time in her lab. Then one day she realizes she’s lonely and doesn’t have any friends. Being a very innovative scientist, Mary decides to create her own friend. She makes a Sheepinator machine. She adds a mixture to some sheep wool and…voilà! Out comes a very useful pet sheep. As the nursery rhyme goes, he followed her to school one day. Mary’s classmates are so impressed with her pet they want one, too. At Mary’s lab, she presses the duplicate button. It gets stuck, and suddenly, chaos ensues. Sheep, sheep everywhere! Her classmates pitch in and help fix the jam, round up the sheep, and give them to farmers. In the meantime, Mary comes up with a new idea. What is it? You’ll have to read this book to find out how Mary, her pet sheep, and her new friends work together for a successful ending to this hilarious story. Sue Fliess‘ rhyming test flows effortlessly, and readers will laugh at the entertaining illustrations by Petros Bouloubasis. This book has it all – girl power, science, innovative thinking, cooperation, and friendship. What more could you ask for?

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Thought for Thursday

May 10, 2018

Oscar+Wilde+Quote+on+Writing

John Deere, That’s Who!

May 3, 2018

It’s spring! Farmers are out plowing their fields, getting them ready to plant crops. Corn and soybean fields surrounded the town where I grew up. If you saw a green tractor, you knew immediately it was a John Deere tractor. John Deere didn’t invent the tractor, but he was instrumental in changing the design of the plow which helped make it easier for farmers to cultivate their land.

deere

If you want to know more about John Deere, the book, John Deere, That’s Who! written by Tracy Nelson Maurer and illustrated by Tim Zeltner is a perfect choice. John Deere was a blacksmith originally from Vermont. In 1836, he took his tools and headed west for a new start. He found a job as a blacksmith in Illinois where he fixed all kinds of things, including plows. The “thick, rich soil” stuck to the farmers’ plows and made their jobs very difficult. Their complaints made John think about creating a plow where the soil wouldn’t stick. John worked hard and after many tries, he finally fashioned a shiny steel plow that would cut through the soil and make plowing easier and faster. That was the beginning of John Deere’s company. Tim Zeltner’s beautiful illustrations and landscapes reminiscent of Grandma Moses art complement Tracy Nelson Maurer’s delightful story about John Deere’s venture into making plows.

 


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