Archive for April 2017

Earth Day 2017

April 20, 2017

“The wealth of the nation is its air, water, soil, forests, minerals, rivers, lakes, oceans, scenic beauty, wildlife habitats and biodiversity… that’s all there is. That’s the whole economy. That’s where all the economic activity and jobs come from. These biological systems are the sustaining wealth of the world.” ~Gaylord Nelson

Gaylord Nelson, a popular political figure from Wisconsin, is the founder of Earth Day. He had the foresight to understand the need to protect our environment. On April 22, 1970, millions of Americans gathered to raise awareness about our environmental problems and demand that our elected officials see the necessity to do something about it.

This Saturday, April 22nd, we continue to celebrate Earth Day. The theme of this year’s event is Environmental and Climate Literacy.

Below are selected picture books to share with young readers to help them become more knowledgeable about our environment and to encourage them to take care of our earth’s precious gifts.

tidy

Tidy written and illustrated by Emily Gravett, Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers

watersong

Watersong written by Tim McCanna and illustrated by Richard Smythe, Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books

giant

The Lonely Giant written and illustrated by Sophie Ambrose, Candlewick Press

pond

Over and Under the Pond written by Kate Messner and illustrated by Christopher Silas Neal, Chronicle Books

bag

One Plastic Bag: IsatouCeesay and the Recycling Women of the Gambia written by Miranda Paul and illustrated by Elizabeth Zunon, Millbrook Press

wangari

Wangari’s Trees of Peace: A True Story from Africa written and illustrated by Jeanette Winter, Harcourt Children’s Books

green

What Does It Mean To Be Green? written by Rana DiOrio and illustrated by Chris Blair, March 4th Inc

garden

The Curious Garden written and illustrated by Peter Brown, Little, Brown Young Readers

lorax

The Lorax written and illustrated by Dr. Seuss, Random House Children’s Books

stew

Compost Stew: An A to Z Recipe for the Earth written by Mary McKenna Siddals and illustrated by Ashley Wolff, Tricycle Press

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s National Library Week

April 13, 2017

“A library is not a luxury but one of the necessities of life.” ~ Henry Ward Beecher

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Town Library

It’s National Library Week. If you haven’t visited your local library recently, now is the time to do it. Libraries are a gift. Read what others have to say about libraries.

“Information helps you to see that you’re not alone. That there’s somebody in Mississippi and somebody in Tokyo who all have wept, who’ve all longed and lost, who’ve all been happy. So the library helps you to see, not only that you are not alone, but that you’re not really any different from everyone else.”          ~ Maya Angelou

photo 16dBoston Public Library

“Libraries store the energy that fuels the imagination. They open up windows to the world and inspire us to explore and achieve, and contribute to improving our quality of life.” ~Sidney Sheldon

scan0010School Library

“It is an awfully sad misconception that librarians simply check books in and out. The library is the heart of a school, and without a librarian, it is but an empty shell.” ~ Jarrett J. Krosoczka

IMG_0873Home Library

“As a kid, I would get my parents to drop me off at my local library on their way to work during the summer holidays, and I would walk home at night. For several years, I read the children’s library until I finished the children’s library. Then I moved into the adult library and slowly worked my way through them.” ~Neil Gaiman

photo 1 (61)Little Free Library

“A library is a good place to go when you feel unhappy, for there, in a book, you may find encouragement and comfort. A library is a good place to go when you feel bewildered or undecided, for there, in a book, you may have your question answered. Books are good company, in sad times and happy times, for books are people – people who have managed to stay alive by hiding between the covers of a book.” ~E.B. White

“Entering a library is like being welcomed into the comfort of home.”       ~Cathy Ogren

Support our libraries!

 

Hooked on Poetry

April 6, 2017

April is National Poetry Month.

What is poetry?

If you ask a child, the answer most likely would be that poetry is something that rhymes. This is true, but we also know that poetry is much more than that. Let’s look at poetry from a child’s point of view. Poems that rhyme are fun because they have rhythm and beat. Kids get into that. If a poem is funny, that’s even a better incentive to get kids hooked on poetry. Exposure to different types of poetry is key to getting kids to read more, more, more.

Mother Goose rhymes are a great starting point to engage children. Most are short and can be acted out. Don’t delay. Unlock the door to poetry, step inside with your child, and enjoy. Take a gander at the poetry books below and see which ones tickle your fancy. There is something for everyone.

mother

Mary Engelbreit’s Mother Goose: One Hundred Best-Loved Verses illustrated by Mary Engelbreit, HarperCollins

lullaby.JPG

Lullaby & Kisses Sweet: Poems to Love with Your Baby selected by Lee Bennett Hopkins and illustrated by Alyssa Nassner, Abrams Appleseed, Board Books

kennedy

Poems to Learn by Heart selected by Caroline Kennedy and illustrated by Jon J. Muth, Disney Press

Patrick

Keep a Pocket in Your Poem: Classic Poems and Playful Parodies selected and written by J. Patrick Lewis and illustrated by Johanna Wright, Wordsong

beat

Feel the Beat: Dance Poems that Zing from Salsa to Swing written by Marilyn Singer and illustrated by Kristi Valiant, Dial Books

sidewalk

Where the Sidewalk Ends written and illustrated by Shel Silverstein

 


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